to possess

< Previous | Next >

Edguoglitigin

Senior Member
Turkish
What is the equivalent of "to possess" in your language?

And please tell me if you know their basic and maybe ancient meaning.
 
Last edited:
  • And please tell me if you know their basic and maybe ancient meaning.
    Bosnian / BCS: posjedovati.

    Etymologically po + sjediti

    The first part, po, has various meanings when used independently such as "over; across; at; for; after; by; according to". It derives from PIE *h2(e)po "off, away".

    The second part, sjediti, means "to sit", from PIE *sed-

    To me posjedovati seems like one of those 19th century calques, but I may be wrong.
     
    Last edited:
    In Greek:
    In the modern language: «Κατέχω» (ka'texo).
    Classical Greek verb «κατέχω» (kă'tĕxō). Compound formed by the joining together of the preposition and prefix «κατὰ» (kā'tă), used as an intensive or with a sense of completion of action (from PIE root *km̥ta-, beside, alongside, near) + verb «ἔχω» ('ĕxō)-->to have, hold (from PIE root *segʰ-, to hold).

    [x] is a voiceless velar fricative
     

    ancalimon

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    As far as I know, there is no Turkish word for "possess". But we use "sahip olmak", which is probably an Arabic loan.

    Still, we can always use "var" : ex: iki arabası var: he has two cars.
     
    Last edited:

    Edguoglitigin

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Bulgarian притежавам, Russian притяжать.
    Is the Russian one basic? I mean Russian say "У меня есть машин" (I have a car) but it is a noun clause. Unlike, English one is verb clause. They do not use a verb to state possession a property or something else. Is it correspondent to Bulgarian as well?
     

    Edguoglitigin

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Bosnian / BCS: posjedovati.

    Etymologically po + sjediti

    The first part, po, has various meanings when used independently such as "over; across; at; for; after; by; according to". It derives from PIE *h2(e)po "off, away".

    The second part, sjediti, means "to sit", from PIE *sed-

    To me posjedovati seems like one of those 19th century calques, but I may be wrong.
    Thanks for the contribution ;) So could you use the verb in a simple sentence? And is it a widespread verb? In translation of "I have a cat", do you use the verb?
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Portuguese: possuir (from Latin possidere, from the stem potis, being able, powerful, plus sidere, to sit) or more commonly ter (to have) (from Latin tenere, to hold).
     

    Orlin

    Banned
    български
    Is the Russian one basic? I mean Russian say "У меня есть машина" (I have a car) but it is a noun clause. Unlike, English one is verb clause. They do not use a verb to state possession a property or something else. Is it correspondent to Bulgarian as well?
    These verbs are rare in both Bulgarian and Russian - they're used only to emphasize possession or in some formal contexts. The impersonal construction you mentioned is the basic in Russian indeed while Bulgarian uses the verb имам (equivalent of the verb "to have" in English and similar verbs in other Indo-European languages).
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Bulgarian притежавам, Russian притяжать.
    There is no such a verb in modern Russian - притяжать, but it could exist in the past. In Russian we still have its derivatives and cognates: притяжательный - possessive (only as grammatical term), стяжать - to gain (bookish).
    The base is тяга - attraction.

    Modern Russian words are обладать, владеть.
    Both derivate from Church-Slavonic владеть - to possess, to own.
    Russian word was володеть and it is a cognate of:
    Old-Prussian walduns (to inherit)
    Gothic waldan - to rule
    αλωτός - sway
    Latin valeo - to be strong.
     
    Last edited:

    Edguoglitigin

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    In Portuguese: possuir (from Latin possidere, from the stem potis, being able, powerful, plus sidere, to sit) or more commonly ter (to have) (from Latin tenere, to hold).
    Thanks ;)

    I just newly learned that the same situation is valid in English as well. According to information (in A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of English) to posses comes from *pots-sidere. Similiarly, pots / potis means "being able, master".
     
    Thanks for the contribution ;) So could you use the verb in a simple sentence? And is it a widespread verb? In translation of "I have a cat", do you use the verb?

    Here's an example from 1949, taken from the Croatian Language Corpus:

    Ja mislim, što nije s pravdom stečeno, ne može se ni s pravom posjedovati.

    I think, that that which has not been obtained by just means, cannot be possessed by right/law either
    It's pretty widespread, but as in English (as far as I know) it is used for a specific meaning - "to possess". We have a separate verb for "to have" - imati, so "I have a cat" would be Imam mačku. I don't think that "I possess a cat" sounds that good in English either. There are other words which in some contexts can replace it, such as vladati "to rule, to govern", držati "to hold" etc.


    Looks like a Latin calque?
    It could be, but it could also be based on German besitzen.
     
    Last edited:

    Orlin

    Banned
    български
    There is no such a verb in modern Russian - притяжать, but it could exist in the past. In Russian we still have its derivatives and cognates: притяжательный - possessive (only as grammatical term), стяжать - to gain (bookish).
    The base is тяга - attraction.

    Modern Russian words are обладать, владеть.
    Both derivate from Church-Slavonic владеть - to possess, to own.
    Russian word was володеть and it is a cognate of:
    Old-Prussian walduns (to inherit)
    Gothic waldan - to rule
    αλωτός - sway
    Latin valeo - to be strong.
    Here's an example from 1949, taken from the Croatian Language Corpus:

    It's pretty widespread, but as in English (as far as I know) it is used for a specific meaning - &quot;to possess&quot;. We have a separate verb for &quot;to have&quot; - imati, so &quot;I have a cat&quot; would be Imam mačku. I don't think that &quot;I possess a cat&quot; sounds that good in English either. There are other words which in some contexts can replace it, such as vladati &quot;to rule, to govern&quot;, držati &quot;to hold&quot; etc.




    It could be, but it could also be based on German besitzen.
    Спасибо за уточнения, Maroseika!
    Кстати, в болгарском языке тоже есть глаголы владея и държа.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian:

    поседувам (poséduvam) = to possess; to own; to have
    имам (ímam) = to have; to possess; to exist; there is
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    Polish ;

    to possess : posiąść , posiadać (verb) [pɔˈɕadaʨ̑], po- siadać (sit) , (lat. possidēre)
    synonyms : mieć, władać, dysponować.

    Posiadanie: ( possession) , lat. possessio.
    posiadacz , właściciel : holder
    posiadłość, majątek : property
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top