to pull off a road on to another one

jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
Joseph pulled off the marsh lane on to the main Greenborough road.
Source: Darkness on the Fens by Joy Ellis

if a vehicle or driver pulls off a road, they stop by the side of it. In this thread, pull off seems to mean to turn off. Is this latter meaning of pull off on to another road common?

Thank you.
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You can pull off and stop on the shoulder of the road, but you can also pull off the road you're on and continue driving on a different one. The latter is probably less common.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    When you pull off one thing, you are often also pulling onto another thing.

    Joseph pulled off the marsh lane (and pulled) onto the main Greenborough road.
    If a vehicle or driver pulls off a road, they pull onto the shoulder.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    And in BE, if we just stop on a road, but at the edge or kerb, (to read a map, for instance, or to answer a call on a mobile phone, or ask a pedestrian where Acacia Avenue is) we would 'pull over'.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'm more comfortable using it going the other direction - you pull off the main road onto a smaller road, especially if it's not well-paved like the main road ("We pulled off/turned off onto a dirt road.") Pulling off onto a bigger road does sound a bit odd to me.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In this thread, pull off seems to mean to turn off. Is this latter meaning of pull off on to another road common?
    In BE, suspect that the latter use is commoner in narrative than colloquially, but it is relatively common. I saw nothing wrong with the example.
     
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