To register / For registeration [registration]

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Amber_1010

Senior Member
Chinese-Cantonese
Hi, I wonder which one I should write. (I'm telling people about the registration process)

1. For regisration, please fill out the forms first, and then fax it back to the office.
2. To register, please fill out the forms first, and then fax it back to the office.

I think 2 is wrong. It sounds so odd to me. We don't say that, do we?
We cannot begin a sentence with to, unless it's: To be eligible for voting, you must be at least 18 year old.

Right?
Please explain and comment.
Thanks!
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Version 2 is correct. Version 1 is incorrect both in grammar and spelling. It is very English to use a verb (register) rather than an abstract noun (registration).

    To answer your second question, yes you can begin a sentence with "to"; I just did. To say the contrary would be untrue. (I did it again!)
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    You're quite right. You can't use simply "to + verb" to give orders, for that you must omit the "to", which leaves you with an imperative form. In your sentence you have used it correctly with Fill out and Fax.

    However, your sentence about registration divides into two parts:

    To register, please fill out the form first, and then fax it back to the office.

    The part in red is giving an order, or rather giving polite instructions. But the part in blue is explaining why; it could have been expressed as "In order to register..."
     

    Amber_1010

    Senior Member
    Chinese-Cantonese
    I can say either:
    1. To register, please fill out the forms and fax it back to the office.
    OR
    2. Please fill out the forms and fax it back to the office for your registration.
    - I need to say it this way, and the pronoun is needed, right?
     
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