to rumble

kva

Senior Member
USA
Russian
Hello,

I am not sure if I understand the verb "to rumble" that I have heard in a conversation correctly. Here is an example. John was talking about Ana. He said: "She always rumbles". He made this remark and it looks like he does not like how she communicates with him.

Does it mean that :

1. She talks too much, sometimes she is not very specific or gives elusive answers.
2. She complains too much, she is not a very optimistic person.

I appreciate your help!
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I've not heard 'to rumble' meaning either of these things. Are you sure he didn't say 'She always grumbles'? That is to say she always moans or complains or finds fault etc
     

    kva

    Senior Member
    USA
    Russian
    Thanks heypresto! I think "grumble" will work. Below is what I have found in the online dictionary. It seems that "grumble" and "rumble" have the same meaning. Is "grumble" more common choice in British vs American English?


    *********************************
    American Heritage Dictionary:grum·ble
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    Home > Library > Literature & Language > Dictionary
    (grŭm'bəl)


    v., -bled, -bling, -bles.v.intr.
    1. To complain in a surly manner; mutter discontentedly: "The governed will always find something to grumble about" (Crane Brinton).
    2. To rumble or growl.
    v.tr.
    To express in a grumbling discontented manner: grumbled a rude response.

    n.
    1. A muttered complaint.
    2. A rumble; a growl.



    Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/grumble#ixzz27nO84acX
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The 'rumble' listed here is referring to a sound or noise. You could describe thunder as rumbling, or as a rumbling sound. Or you could say 'it rumbled' like thunder. And it's also used when we talk about our stomachs rumbling when we're hungry.

    This doesn't sound like what John meant. Or does it?
     

    kva

    Senior Member
    USA
    Russian
    I think John meant that Ana complains a lot and she is not positive and not very enthusiastic when he asked her to do something for him. I got an impression that he is actually dislikes her for no reason. But may be I am wrong and making things up since I did not understand the word.

    I think "rumble" will fit for option 2 "She complains too much". Could it be slang expression?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think the option 2 meaning of rumble is slang for grumbling, or complaining, or not being very enthusiastic. I think that 'grumble' mus be the right word.
     

    kva

    Senior Member
    USA
    Russian
    yes, it's the word I was looking for. My confusion was that I just heard it as 'rumble' :))
    Thanks for your help!
     
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