to sell out (dimitir, retirarse)

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JUNIO

Senior Member
Spanish, Spain
Hola,
me he encontrado varias veces con este verbo y por contexto, parece que significa "dimitir o retirarse". ¿Es posible? Son espías del gobierno (siglo XIX) y todos han "sold out".


Gracias
 
  • aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    En principio, se han vendido. Han sido sobornados, han abandonado los principios.
    "Sold out" con el significado de "retirarse" tendría sentido sólo en el caso del proprietario de un negocio.
     

    JUNIO

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Uff, ves, pues, en principio, eso no me cuadra con el contexto para nada. Estoy al principio de la novela. A ver si cobra algún sentido más adelante...
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    As azt says, but also "were/have been sold out". Their identities revealed by some baddy.

    Also "no longer effective/useful" for some reason.

    M.
     

    JUNIO

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    "Is it true we've all sold out?" There were nods and glances all around; Deverell grinned. "Is it polite to inquire why?" He looked at Christinan. "In your case, I assume Allardyce must now become Dearne?"
    Wryly Christian inclined his head. "Indeed. Once my father died, and I came into the title, any choice evaporated. If it hadn't been for Waterloo, I would already be mired in issues pertaining to sheep and cattle...
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Me parece que son militares, no espías.
    Hasta hace un par de siglos, había compraventa de "comisiones" para ser oficial en las fuerzas armadas británicas. Un coronel o general podría sell his commission para poder jubilarse.
    Uno de tus protagonistas comenta que hubiera dejado el ejército antes si no fuera por los "cien días" de Napoleón tras su fuga.
    Como aquí:
    Biography - William Acland Douglas Anderson - Australian ...He sold his commission and retired from the British army in March 1854. From
    May 1856 to April 1857 he was a commissioner for Melbourne's sewers and
    water ...
    adb.anu.edu.au/biography/anderson-william-acland-douglas-2886

    Mira aquí:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sale_of_commissions
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    Then it is the version give by azt---------negocios.

    Han liquidado negocios o recursos que tenian o habían heredado.

    M.

    That's on the way. A commission was a "recurso que se podía liquidar". Perhaps there's a term in military Spanish.
     
    Last edited:

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    I don't know if it helps.

    A shop that is closing down in my country, might have signs on its windows-------"closing sale/sell out". In Spain one would see "liquidación".

    M.
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    I don't know if it helps.

    A shop that is closing down in my country, might have signs on its windows-------"closing sale/sell out". In Spain one would see "liquidación".

    M.
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    The real problem is that Junio has not made a study of the phrasal verb "to sell out" in all its meanings and applications. I've got a TEFL certificate, but do not consider that this forum is a suitable place from which to to teach English. Maybe others do. WR certainly does not. The forum is to support specific meanings of words and phrases in a dictionary.

    Junio must have realised by now where the problem is, and is using the more than adequate resources of the WEB to correct the deficiency.

    M.
     
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