To shoot (metaphorical)

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
The "fall" thread reminded me of the verb 'schieten" (shoot) that is often used metaphorically in Dutch, but not so much in other languages, I think

A plant shoot, een scheut
Schiet je me even geld voor (Would you mind lending me some money) as in een voorschot, an advance...

Suggesting an idea of speed
De X schieten als paddestoelen uit de grond (The X turn rampant or something the like: suddenly they seem to grow out of the soil very quickly, like mushrooms)
Zijn doel voorbijschieten (not to reach a goal, but often due to speed, doing things hastily: passing past the target, goal)
Uitschieten, get very angry (lit. shoot out)
Het schoot mij te binnen (I suddenly remembered: it entered my mind again)

There are more, but less important, I think, and based on the main meanings (speed, sudden)...
 
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  • Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    In Spanish, the verb matar has 18 (official) meanings plus the (also official) meaning of to kill (see Matar). One of them is to try hard to get something. Example: Se mató por conseguir ese trabajo.

    I'm thinking that I'm not sure what's the sense that you are giving to to shoot. Maybe isn't so much the sense of matar but that of disparar?
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Shooting/ schieten is not really killing. shoot down might be a synonym. Shooting requires a gun, pistol or bow in the literal meaning. But do you associate it with "matar" in Spanish? Oh, but I now notice that shooting to kill is translated as "matar per un tiro", wounding is '"pegar un tiro", whereas shooting/schieten is the blast + sending a projectile somewhere... I suppose there is no real equivalent in Spanish (and maybe not in French and Italian)...
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    I now notice that shooting to kill is translated as "matar per un tiro"
    I'd say that's tirar a matar.

    do you associate it with "matar" in Spanish?
    The obvious association is with disparar but for some unknown reason when I read the post I associated it with matar what it's a more obscure association (if someone sees you in a hunting with a death animal and asks you: Where did you shoot it? S/he is asking you not so much where the projectile left the gun… but: Where did you kill it?).
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Interesting observation. We do associate shooting with killing too, especially when there is (a particular kind of) direct object like animals, or if the subject is identified as a murderer. But the starting point is the blast + the launch of the bullet/...; however, the meaning has evolved towards killing, the effect, indeed.
    But I suppose we could refer to "shoot" without an object here: "he was shooting around" or something the like. How would you describe that in Spanish? Do you have a specific verb for that and can you use it metaphorically?
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    "To shoot" is "disparar" in Spanish. Of course, no verb is 100% overlapping with its equivalent in another language. In this case, you can use "to shoot" referring to the effect of the action (not necessarily killing, just the bullet impacting something), but you can't in Spanish. I guess you could use "dar" in this sense.

    Anyway, as for the metaphorical usages of "disparar" in Spanish, I can think of "to skyrocket" as in "los precios se han disparado" ("prices have skyrocketed"). Also if someone's going to ask you a question you can say "venga, ¡dispara!", kind of like "come on, go ahead!". Also, "salir disparado" means to "pop off", like to depart at an immediately fast speed, bullet-like.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Shoot literally means to move suddenly or initiate a sudden mechanism causing a series of events to ensue. The association with guns and killing comes from that: "make a swift movement that propels a bullet through the air and brings about a fast murder". You should not see it as the murder itself but the steps leading up to it. Also you can shoot someone with a gun and not necessarily kill him. Other than that you can shoot many things and probably many more than on this list as it's an active verb, not just fixed expressions from some time in the past: Often Romance languages use Tirer / Tirar / Tirare in a similar way.
    Shoot bullets/missils
    Shoot pool / craps/ dice / marbles
    Shoot arrows/ darts / hoops
    Shoot drugs
    Shoot goals (balls, pucks)
    Shoot movies
    Shoot photographs/ x-rays
    Shoot garbage
    Shoot lava (volcanos)
    Shoot smoke (factories or smokers too)
    Shoot water

    There's also the strange expression "shoot the breeze with someone". I suppose people are talking/ gossiping for such a long time the breeze is propelled from their mouths. Also Shoot! - Go ahead! Say what s on your mind!
    There are also several phrasal verbs that are formed with shoot that can take on all sorts of different and unpredictable meaning
    Shoot up - to rise quickly (prices, interests rates...) or to take drugs in a liquid form intraveneously
    Shoot off - to make noise (fireworks), to tell a secret or to ejaculate
    Shoot at - to have aspirations for the future, to strive for some kind of objective, or to try to make something happen.
    Shoot down - to disparage, to reject a person or a plan or to thwart the plans someone has to do something.
     
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    KalAlbè

    Senior Member
    American English & Kreyòl Ayisyen
    A popular slang nowadays in AE is shoot your shot. It's probably taken from basketball and it means to overcome your fear and pursue someone you're interested in.

    E.g. Today I'm gonna go up to her and shoot my shot.
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek the v. used is «εκτοξεύω/εκτοξεύομαι» [ek.tɔˈk͜se.vɔ] (active) --> lit. to shoot out/away arrows/[ek.tɔˈk͜se.vɔ.me] (mediopassive) --> lit. to be shot out/away as arrow < Classical v. «ἐκτοξεύω/ἐκτοξεύομαι» ĕktŏkseú̯ō (active)/ĕktŏkseú̯ŏmai̯ (passive) with similar meanings < prefix & preposition «ἐκ» ĕk + Classical neut. «τόξον» tóksŏn --> bow (of unknown etymology, initially thought an Iranic loan, now it's considerd Pre-Greek; for Beekes, the Mycenaean attestation: to-ko-so-ta «τοξότας» (tŏksótās), bowman, disproves the possibility of a Persian or Scythian loan).

    Examples:
    «Οι τιμές εκτοξεύθηκαν στα ύψη» [i tiˈmes ek.tɔˈk͜sef.θi.kan sta ˈi.p͜si] --> (the) prices (of products) were shot out as arrows sky high (prices went sky high)
    «Η επιτυχία του εκτόξευσε την φήμη του» [i e.pi.tiˈçi.a tu ekˈtɔ.k͜sef.se tin ˈfi.mi tu] --> his success shot out as arrow his reputation (his success skyrocketed his reputation).
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Anyway, as for the metaphorical usages of "disparar" in Spanish, I can think of "to skyrocket" as in "los precios se han disparado" ("prices have skyrocketed"). Also if someone's going to ask you a question you can say , kind of like "come on, go ahead!". Also, "salir disparado" means to "pop off", like to depart at an immediately fast speed, bullet-like.
    Perfect. I recognize: prijzen schieten omhoog/ prices skyrocket [shoot up-high]. "venga, ¡dispara!": I think that in my dialect I could say: Schiet je weg ["Shoot yourself away" (not suggesting suicide!), hurry away]...
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Very interesting. Thanks! I have marked in blue what I recognize...
    I
    Shoot literally means to move suddenly or initiate a sudden mechanism causing a series of events to ensue. The association with guns and killing comes from that: "make a swift movement that propels a bullet through the air and brings about a fast murder". You should not see it as the murder itself but the steps leading up to it. Also you can shoot someone with a gun and not necessarily kill him. Other than that you can shoot many things and probably many more than on this list as it's an active verb, not just fixed expressions from some time in the past: Often Romance languages use Tirer / Tirar / Tirare in a similar way.
    Shoot bullets/missils
    Shoot pool / craps/ dice / marbles
    Shoot arrows/ darts / hoops
    Shoot drugs
    Shoot goals (balls, pucks)
    Shoot movies
    Shoot photographs/ x-rays
    Shoot garbage -- What do you mean?
    Shoot lava (volcanos)
    Shoot smoke (factories or smokers too)
    Shoot water

    There's also the strange expression "shoot the breeze with someone". I suppose people are talking/ gossiping for such a long time the breeze is propelled from their mouths. Also Shoot! - Go ahead! Say what s on your mind!
    There are also several phrasal verbs that are formed with shoot that can take on all sorts of different and unpredictable meaning
    Shoot up - to rise quickly (prices, interests rates...) or to take drugs in a liquid form intraveneously
    Shoot off - to make noise (fireworks), to tell a secret or to ejaculate
    Shoot at - to have aspirations for the future, to strive for some kind of objective, or to try to make something happen.
    Shoot down - to disparage, to reject a person or a plan or to thwart the plans someone has to do something.
    REnglish seems to use "shoot" even more often than we do!
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    In Greek the v. used is «εκτοξεύω/εκτοξεύομαι» [ek.tɔˈk͜se.vɔ] (active) --> lit. to shoot out/away arrows/[ek.tɔˈk͜se.vɔ.me] (mediopassive) --> lit. to be shot out/away as arrow < Classical v. «ἐκτοξεύω/ἐκτοξεύομαι» ĕktŏkseú̯ō (active)/ĕktŏkseú̯ŏmai̯ (passive) with similar meanings < prefix & preposition «ἐκ» ĕk + Classical neut. «τόξον» tóksŏn --> bow (of unknown etymology, initially thought an Iranic loan, now it's considerd Pre-Greek; for Beekes, the Mycenaean attestation: to-ko-so-ta «τοξότας» (tŏksótās), bowman, disproves the possibility of a Persian or Scythian loan).
    You cannot combine this with a bullet or something, I suppose. He shot at someone = ... ? (Thanks)
     
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