to shrug on [a jacket]

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Jeepster

Senior Member
does to shrug on mean to put on (probably not thrusting arms into the sleeves?) or to adjust (e.g. a coat) by a jerk or a sway of the shoulders

??

as in
She shrugs on her blazer, waves goodbye, and heads for the door

Robin Sloan. MR. Penumbra’s 24-hour bookstore
 
Last edited:
  • truepurple

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Most people would say you put a jacket on. From context I would take it it's meant she used the motion of shrugging, AKA raising your shoulders, to put her jacket on.

    Seeing as most people need to draw their arms through a jacket to put it on, I don't see how using raised shoulders to put a jacket on would work. Even to the point of getting the jacket over the shoulders, seeing as lowering the shoulders, not raising them, is better for this.

    Maybe the jacket is resting on her shoulders with her arms outside the sleeves, then I can see using shrug motion to "put it on" working.

    But it is not a proper phrase that would mean anything to most English speakers,(as a phrase, it would mean something with the individual words which I already covered) as far as I know. I think this falls into the realm of poetic license.

    Perhaps what is meant is that the jacket was put on without much thought, casually like. A shrug indicates not knowing, it can also imply a lack of interest.
     
    Hi true,

    I think you're being too dogmatic. It's quite understandable and 5 mins search turns up several instances--at least 10, of which I quote 2. It's a word with some logic as the raising of shoulders can be part of the several motions of putting on a jacket and making sure it sits right.
    =======================
    https://books.google.ca/books?id=rhba4Gm_8bEC&pg=PA40&lpg=PA40

    The Restoration of Emily: A Novel - Page 40 - Google Books Result

    Kim Moritsugu - 2006 - ‎Fiction
    where he throws a T-shirt, shorts, and his ankle brace into the bag, shrugs on his jacket, and says, "What? I'm ready. Are you?" "Let's just go."


    https://books.google.ca/books?id=-O09CgAAQBAJ&pg=PT245

    And Then He Kissed Her - Google Books Result

    Melinda Curtis, ‎Ciara Knight, ‎Brinda Berry - 2015 - ‎Fiction

    He shrugs on his jacket and straddles his bike. “Ladies?” He nods to Suzanna and Riley who are staring openmouthed at him.
    ===============
    ===============

    Most people would say you put a jacket on. From context I would take it it's meant she used the motion of shrugging, AKA raising your shoulders, to put her jacket on.
    [...]

    But it is not a proper phrase that would mean anything to most English speakers,(as a phrase, it would mean something with the individual words which I already covered) as far as I know. I think this falls into the realm of poetic license.

    Perhaps what is meant is that the jacket was put on without much thought, casually like. A shrug indicates not knowing, it can also imply a lack of interest.
     
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