to slide home to level the scores/soccer/football

azz

Senior Member
armenian
Does this sentence work?


The same player created the second goal just before the break, a smart ball to the left where Rooney crossed for Van Persie to slide home to level the scores.


Full context:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/soccer/news/20140319/champions-league-van-persie-manchester-united-olympiakos-dortmund-zenit/index.html?section=si_latest




It seems to me that "to slide home" has no object. What is slid home? If we had 'which Rooney crossed for Van Persie' than it would be the ball. But it says 'where'.


Many Thanks.
 
  • Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is referring to football (soccer).

    It's almost certainly referring to Van Persie sliding the ball home, which is a controlled, low, well placed, generally relatively easy shot.

    However, it could be referring to Van Persie sliding in (on the end of the cross) to score.

    In both cases the ball is slid home. In the first, "sliding" refers to the type of shot, in the second "sliding" refers to the action of the player.

    There are loads of odd phrases and corruptions of normal English in football... don't expect consistency.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    It's not that clear to me. I don't think it's a baseball reference, and I don't think they would write that way about European football, aka, soccer.

    Then, two moments of vision and class which rolled back the years: A 20-yard lofted pass for Rooney to head onto the post and then, from further back, a ball onto van Persie's chest, which the Dutchman controlled before a shove from Holebas earned him a penalty. Van Persie made no mistake from the spot but it was Giggs who restored United's belief.

    The same player created the second goal just before the break, a smart ball to the left where Rooney crossed for Van Persie to slide home to level the scores.



    I understand that the one player (Van Persie) "slid the goal home" to level the score, at that point in the game. Rooney went by. Giggs caused the play to happen in the first place.

    EDIT: Cross-posted with Smauler.
     
    Last edited:

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thank you both very much.

    If I am not mistaken Rooney crosses= Rooney sends the ball over across the width of the field.
    So Giggs sends a smart ball (don't know what 'smart' means here, but I would hazard it means fast) ball to Rooney who is on the left side of the pitch. Rooney then crosses the ball over to Van Persia, who slides it into the goal.

    The first action (starting with a 20-yard lofted pass) is distinct from the second. Both actions were started by forty-year-old Giggs.

    This is definitely about European football, aka soccer. No question about that at all.

    Many Thanks.

    But to me, in that sentence 'slides' needs an object.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "... for X [player] to slide home" is often seen in BrE football reports. The object is "the ball", but that's understood, so it's omitted. This omission is seen with other verbs in a football context, eg "Eriksen crossed from the right and Adebayor headed in from five yards": Adebayor headed the ball into the goal.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I agree with sound shift. In this case, "the ball" does appear in the text.

    The same player created the second goal just before the break, a smart ball to the left where Rooney crossed for Van Persie to slide home to level the scores.

    In other words, the object is there---"a smart ball"---but it's early on in the clause, if that makes sense.
     
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