to sock up

  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    That's a bit of a mystery.
    Overage is surplus of some kind.
    Socked up - driven up, forced up?
    Why have staff cuts forced something up?
    Perhaps it's as simple as:
    Staff cuts have led to increased profit for us.

    But then who's to know with lyrics anyway.
     

    dublin01

    Member
    Ireland english
    Hi - I think the lyric is actually "Staff cuts have socked up the overage". So, the meaning of 'To sock' would imply to smack or to hit or to punch...
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Dublin has a point :D

    I suppose it means that staff cuts were a bit of a blow to old people who used to work there? (As in they got rid of them...? :confused:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I've got the feeling "overage" is some kind of Stock Market term??:confused:

    Loob
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    It could be. But M-W defines it as:
    1 : too old to be useful
    2 : older than is normal for one's position, function, or grade
    Source

    So it could be that staff cuts have affected the seniors :p

    Of course I could never make any sense of REM lyrics :rolleyes:

    EDIT: I forgot. Here's a link to the lyrics so I can get a good answer :p: Daysleeper.
     

    marquess

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    It could be. But M-W defines it as:

    Source

    So it could be that staff cuts have affected the seniors :p

    Of course I could never make any sense of REM lyrics :rolleyes:
    Hi Trisia,
    I think your definition of being 'overage' , in the state of being 'over-age(d)' is correct, but does not apply here. The 'Overage' is being used as a noun, I think for an amount above a target (a bonus scheme, or a ratio of staff to sales, staff hours to sales, paper receipts to cash) etc. which has been 'socked-up' artificially, disproportionately, or unfairly, by staff cuts.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I wondered what all this talk of ancient people had to do with the topic!
    An overage is a surplus of some kind - see post #2.
    Sorry if I didn't make that clear enough.
    Grumble, grumble, grumble.
    Kids these days.
    I wonder why I bother.
    Have a great weekend :)
     

    GamblingCamel

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In case it might help... The song is about people (men) who work on shifts, and also a sort of criticism of world powers.
    Thank you for the clue. And thank you for asking a question about lyrics (especially from a Southern rock band ... which is a bit absurd to say to a Chilean, eh?). Lyrics are often loaded with double meanings and ambiguities. Thus they lend themselves well to speculation.

    My take on "overage" is that it might refer to the huge surplus inventory that is piling up
    (that is being "socked up" or "increased") in the receiving department.
    More work for these exasperated workers -- these exhausted daysleepers.

    Gvergara, are you familiar with the ordinary definition of R.E.M.?
    "Rapid eye movement while you are dreaming during sleep."
    Quite possibly, R.E.M. doesn't function as enjoyably for a "daysleeper", which would add an additional protest edge to the song, even if not intended by the songwriters themselves.
     

    GamblingCamel

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Here are examples of "overage" relating to inventory.

    The first is on the AE supplychain.com site.
    "Is my overage inventory lower now than it was three months ago? "

    The second is BE, from inventorymatters.co.uk (you gotta love the pun!)
    It refers to a publication, "Overage Inventory -- How does it occur and why is it important?".

    Leave it to a rock group to get us thinking about business accounting. ;)
     

    MissSquare

    Member
    Canada, English
    The omnipotent internet doesn't seem to give a definitive version of these lyrics. I found many transciptions of each:
    staff cuts have socked up
    staff cuts have sucked up
    staff cuts have soaked up

    I think "socked" is just incorrect, and probably got copy-pasted around.

    I also just watched the video on youtube, and my personal interpretation is "sucked up"--but it is hard to tell.

    I feel the meaning of the sentence is clear, listening to it in context. The sentence means "Firing some staff members has allowed the company to balance their budget (they had been overspending)". The implication in the song is that this means more work to do and fewer people to do it.
     

    GamblingCamel

    Senior Member
    USA English
    MissSquare ( sss -- 3 in a row -- wow! )
    When I first saw this post, I was surprised to see "socked up", because that's fairly uncommon AE.
    But I've just listened a few times to the video, and it does sound like "socked up" to me.

    You're right that understanding the song emotionally in no way depends on understanding that specific word. ;)

    By the way, for those unfamiliar with AE, the singer's voice is not typically Southern or Georgian. It's very different from Jimmy Carter's, for instance.
     
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