to sorn

Ilmo

Member Emeritus
I am not sure, whether all know the verb "to sorn". "To sorn on a person" means, according to my sources, to live/to lodge in a person's house/home without paying for it.

In Finnish we have a corresponding verb kiinata, that is quite apparently derived from the proper name China.

In Swedish the corresponding verb is kinesa, and it is quite clear that it has the same origin.

How is it in your language, have you a verb for this purpose?
And, could someone explain, for what reasons it seems to originate (at least in these two languages) from the name of China or Chinese?
 
  • Touse

    Member
    Dutch
    In Dutch the verb would be KRAKEN. And the person who lives in the house, illegally, without paying rent, is a "KRAKER"
     

    Touse

    Member
    Dutch
    Hi Ilmo, scrap my previous suggestion. It is wrong. I was being too hasty, translating the description you gave rather than the term. Kraken means "to squat", kraker is "squatter". My apologies.

    I would translate "to sorn" in Dutch as KLAPLOPEN, and the person doing "the sorning" is a KLAPLOPER. Alternatively you could use PARASITEREN, which is similar to how you might tranlate it in French: VIVRE EN PARASITE. But these words are not necessarily exclusively linked to abusing hospitality, as in to stay in someone's house without paying rent. They also apply to a larger context, as in systematically abusing someone's generosity by having them always be the one to pick up the tab, be it in restaurants, pubs etc. Comparable to "to sponge on/off, to scrounge, to freeload (AE) ..."

    Klaplopen and klaploper have an interesting etymology as well. They derive from the Middle Dutch "klapspaen", which is a rattler. In the Middle Ages lepers had to announce their arrival with a rattler. People would then set out food for them. Free of charge of course.

    Touse :)
     
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    samanthalee

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, English - [Singapore]
    I am not sure, whether all know the verb "to sorn". "To sorn on a person" means, according to my sources, to live/to lodge in a person's house/home without paying for it.

    In Finnish we have a corresponding verb kiinata, that is quite apparently derived from the proper name China.

    In Swedish the corresponding verb is kinesa, and it is quite clear that it has the same origin.

    How is it in your language, have you a verb for this purpose?
    And, could someone explain, for what reasons it seems to originate (at least in these two languages) from the name of China or Chinese?
    In Chinese we say 白吃白住 [white eat white live] ("white" means "without reward" and in this case means eating and living without giving reward to the provider of food and lodging)

    Such usage usually has some historical reasons, but Finland and Sweden don't feature much in the Chinese history...this is puzzling to me too...
     

    olivinha

    Senior Member
    Português, Brasil
    By what I understand by sorn (imposing on another's hospitality or generosity), in Brazil we have this very casual expression:

    "viver na aba do chapéu de alguém"

    It means that one, without a hat of his own, lives under the brim of someone else's hat.


    O

    PS: To answer the question, I can't think of a specific verb in BP Portuguese that convey such meaning.
     
    In Greek it's a periphrasis:

    «Ζω εις βάρος του άλλου» [zɔ is ˈva.ɾɔs tu ˈa.lu] --> to live as a burden to the other

    Squating is called «κατάληψη» [kaˈta.li.p͡si] (fem.) --> lit. seizure, also, occupation, squating < Classical 3rd declension v. «κατάληψις» kătắlēpsis (fem. nom. sing.), «καταλήψεως» kătălḗpsĕōs (fem. gen. sing.) --> seizing, assaulting, taking possession, occupation < Classical prefix & preposition «κατά» kătắ + Classical 3rd declension deverbative noun «λῆψις» lêpsis --> capture, apprehension, attack of a disease, full-grade form of v. «λαμβάνω» lămbắnō.
    The v. is «καταλαμβάνω» [ka.ta.lamˈva.nɔ] & the person who commits the act is called «καταληψίας» [ka.ta.liˈp͡si.as] (masc. & fem.).
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, we borrowed the word from English:
    squatter [skwate] (verb) = to squat

    By the way, the English word itself comes from old French esquatir (= to crouch). Not the only case of such a word which went back and forth from French, then English, then French again, losing its primitive meaning.
     
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    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    I've never heard the word kiinata.
    I'd use elää jonkun siivellä (lit. "to live on someone's wing") or siipeillä (from siipi "wing", from the expression), although they don't necessarily mean living in someone's house. You could say siipeillä jonkun luona "siipeillä at someone" to make clear it's about staying in his/her house.
     
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