To steal one's thunder

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Schrodinger's_Cat

Senior Member
American English
To steal ones' thunder is to grab attention from another especially by anticipating an idea, plan, or presentation ; also : to claim credit for another's idea.

Could I say rubare il tuono di qualcuno? Does it make sense in Italian?

Someone 'steals your thunder' when they use your ideas or inventions to their own advantage.
 
  • miri

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    Meaning "to anticipate an idea/suggestion" = "battere sul tempo"

    "Mi ha battuto sul tempo"
     

    Necsus

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Oxford Paravia gives a little different meaning:
    to steal sb.’s thunder, battere qcn. sul tempo.

    And KudoZ:
    to steal one's thunder > rubare le idee.

    And that's the definition from The Free Dictionary:
    steal (someone's) thunder - To use, appropriate, or preempt the use of another's idea, especially to one's own advantage and without consent by the originator.

    And from Webster:
    steal one's thunder - to grab attention from another especially by anticipating an idea, plan, or presentation ; also : to claim credit for another's idea.

    Oops...miri... ;)
     

    Schrodinger's_Cat

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks to all, Paul, Necsus and Miri.

    The reason I posted rubare il tuono is because I thought of Zeus (Greek mythology) and in the Roman mythology, there are Jupiter (the daylight god) and Summanus (the nocturnal god). I thought that a mortal from ancient Greece or ancient Rome, or both, stole the thunder of one of these gods. But I did a google search, but couldn't find any reference to stealing thunder from an ancient god(s).

    The only reference to stealing one's thunder I found is:

    http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-ste2.htm
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Hi BenVitale, this might interest you from the Oxford English Dictionary:

    OED said:
    d. Fig. phr. to steal (someone's) thunder: to use the ideas, policies, etc., devised by another person, political party, etc., for one's own advantage or to anticipate their use by the originator.
    Derived from the utterance of John Dennis (1657-1734), ‘Damn them!..they will not let my play run, but they steal my thunder,’ on hearing the stage thunder produced by a method designed for his own play of Appius & Virginia being used for a performance of Macbeth. (Spence quoted in W. S. Walsh Lit. Curios. (1893) 1052; cf. Pope's note on Dunciad II. 223.)
     
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