to sulk

Welsh_Sion

Member
Welsh - Northern
We have the expression in Cymraeg/Welsh of 'llyncu mul' to convey the idea that someone is sulking. The literal translation is that the person has 'swallowed a mule/donkey'.

Any figurative expressions in your language for this unappealing habit?
 
  • Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Sardinian we have a particular expression for "sulking"

    ammuzzighiladu = literally "with the muzzle"

    it's an adjective and also the masculine past participle of "ammuzzighilare" (to have the muzzle), which also derives from "muzzighile" (muzzle, snout, face).

    Example :
    • cuss'homine est ammuzzighiladu (that man is sulking)
    • cussa femina est ammuzzighilada (that woman is sulking)
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek sulking is «κατσούφιασμα» [kaˈʦ͡u.fçaz.ma] (neut.), the verb is «κατσουφιάζω» [ka.ʦ͡uˈfça.zɔ] and the person is «κατσούφης» [ [kaˈʦu.fis] (masc.), «κατσούφα» [kaˈʦ͡u.fa] (fem.).

    The word comes from the ancient Greek adjective «κατηφής, -φής, -φές» kătēpʰḗs (masc. & fem.), kătēpʰés (neut.) --> with downcast eyes, ashamed, sad after tsitacism (=the palatalization of velar phonemes before high front vowels, especially [c] (/k/) > [ʧ] or [ts]).
    Its etymology is uncertain, possibly from «κατά» kătắ + v. «ἅπτω» hắptō as having the view downwards.

    Figuratively, we have the expression «κρατάω μούτρα» [kraˈta.ɔ ˈmu.tra] --> lit. to hold face; «μούτρα» (neut. nom. pl.), is the colloqualism of face in MoGr (mug?) < Byz. Gr. «μοῦτρον» moûtron (neut. nom. sing.), «μοῦτρα» moûtra (neut. nom. pl.) --> face(s), of uncertain etymology.
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish:
    pitää mykkäkoulua "to keep(?) a mute school" (school for mutes)

    Jurottaa "to sulk" < juro "sulky" is probably related to jurista/jurahtaa "to growl/snarl", but it's also used for fish that don't move.
    Where I live, the local people say mullitella. I don't know if it has anything to do with mulli (bull calf), at least I can't see a connection.
    Murjottaa and mököttää are of unknown etymology.
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Figuratively, we have the expression «κρατάω μούτρα» [kraˈta.ɔ ˈmu.tra] --> lit. to hold face; «μούτρα» (neut. nom. pl.), is the colloqualism of face in MoGr (mug?) < Byz. Gr. «μοῦτρον» moûtron (neut. nom. sing.), «μοῦτρα» moûtra (neut. nom. pl.) --> face(s), of uncertain etymology.
    This is interesting, there is another Sardinian noun with the same meaning, that could have arrived in Sardinian from Greek language, during the Byzantine age. Or it could be a residue of pre-IE languages.

    moûtron -> Latinized "mutrus" -> Vulgar version "mutru" -> current Sardinian "murru" (muzzle, snout)

    While the word I mentioned above (muzzighile) could be a residue from Paleo-Sardinian language, a pre-IE language supposedly related to Basque, according to the substratum present in Sardinian language and place names, that is comparable only with Basque.

    We also have a cognate in Corsican language (muccighile).

    While the Basque word is "mustupil"

    possible evolution : "mustupil -> mustipil -> mustigil -> muztigil -> mutzigil -> mutzighile"

    (The switches from P/B to G and from U to I and viceversa are documented during the evolution from Latin to Sardinian)
     
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