to swallow / tolerate

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
When thinking of Dutch I can see a lot of words related with the digestive tract that are use to refer to (in)tolerance.

Examples(
I don't accept/tolerate (an insult): ik slik het niet (I don't swallow it),
I can't accept something:
- Ik krijg het niet door mijn strot (I don't get it through my throat)/ zij moeten het door mijn strot rammen (they'll have to push it through my throat)
[of course s-trot is our equivalent with s mobile of throat)
- ik heb er mijn buik van vol: I have my tummy full ( of it)
- (I keep thinking of it); het ligt op mijn maag (lit. it is [lying] on my stomach)
- viscerale afkeer; visceral contempt (referring to tummy, belly)
 
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  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Yes it's the same in French :

    Je n'arrive pas à digérer ce qu'il m'a dit (lit. I can't digest what he said to me)
    Ça me reste en travers de la gorge (lit. It remains across my throat)
    C'est difficile à avaler (lit. It's hard to swallow)
    Ça me reste sur l'estomac (lit. It remains on my stomach)
    Un dégoût viscéral (lit. a visceral disgust)
    Ça m'en remue les tripes (lit. It moves my guts)

    and certainly many others which might come to my mind later....
     
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    Dymn

    Senior Member
    I don't accept/tolerate (an insult): ik slik het niet (I don't swallow it),
    In Catalan, pair "to digest" can have two different figurative meanings:

    - No paeixo aquest paio. I can't stand this guy. [only used for people]
    - Costa de pair aquesta notícia. This news is hard to accept. [like, adapting mentally to it]

    Empassar-se ("to swallow") refers to buying into something: no m'ho empasso "I don't believe it"

    Also, tip refers to both being literally and figuratively fed up:

    - Vols més galetes? No, gràcies, estic tip. Do you want more cookies? No, thanks, I'm full.
    - Estic tip d'aquests romanços. I'm sick of these lies.

    Fart can be used for the second sentence but not the first one. And then you can also use fer-se un tip/fart de something unpleasant which you have to do a lot:

    Em faig un fart/tip de dir-los que no vinguin aquí. I'm always telling them not to come here.

    - viscerale afkeer; visceral contempt (referring to tummy, belly)
    Yes, odi visceral.
     
    In Greek too it's common to use negation in order to show distress, denial or intolerance, e.g:

    «Δεν μπορώ να το καταπιώ» [ðeɱ bɔˈɾɔ na tɔ ka.taˈp͡çɔ] --> I can't swallow it (what s/he said or did)
    «Δεν μπορώ να το χωνέψω» [ðeɱ bɔˈɾɔ na tɔ xɔˈne.p͡sɔ] --> I can't digest it (what s/he said or did)

    -MoGr v. «καταπίνω» [ka.taˈpi.nɔ] --> to swallow, gulp < Classical v. «καταπίνω» kătăpínō --> to swallow, absorb, consume (of liquids and solids) < Classical prefix & preposition «κατά» kătắ + Classical v. «πίνω» pínō --> to drink (PIE *peh₃-/*ph₃-i- to drink; the n- in the present indicative «πίνω» and (Doric) «πώνω» have no counterparts in other lE languages, and therefore seem to be innovations within Greek. The archaic formation is the reduplicated present *pi-ph₃- cf Skt. पिबति (pibatī), to absorb, Lat. bibere).
    -MoGr v. «χωνεύω» [xɔˈne.vɔ] --> to digest < Classical denominative v. «χοανεύω/χωνεύω» kʰŏăneú̯ō (uncontracted)/kʰōneú̯ō (contracted) --> to cast in a mould, smelt metal, metaph. to get together (the meaning of digestion is much younger) < Classical masc. «χόανος» kʰóanŏs --> smelting furnace, funnel (PIE *ǵʰeu̯- to pour cf Hitt. ku-uz-za, wall (heaped up), Skt. हुति (huti), sacrifice, ToA/B käw- to pour, Lat. fundere, Arm. ձև (ʣ͡ew), form < *ǵʰeu̯-o-).
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I re cognize that in Dutch: there is a problem when digestion is blocked, indeed. But nothing like "lying on the stomach"? Could the χωνεύω be a metaphor for the stomach, the digestion power plant? be a metaphor for the stomach, the digestion power plant?
     
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    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish:
    En voi sulattaa sitä "I can't digest it" = I can't tolerate it
    En niele sitä "I don't swallow it" = I don't accept it
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Some examples in Spanish:

    Revolvérsele a alguien el estómago (to stir something the stomach to someone): to cause aversión.
    No lo trago (I don't swallow it): I can't bear with it.

    Ça m'en remue les tripes (lit. It moves my guts)
    The Spanish version of that one is se me revuelven las tripas.
    odi visceral
    In Spanish, visceral is used with the same meaning.
     

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    The closest thing is olla täynnä "to be full", meaning I've had enough, I'm fed up with something. It can be strengthened with olla kurkkua myöten täynnä "to be full up to the throat".
     

    sheri_f

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Some examples in Spanish:

    Revolvérsele a alguien el estómago (to stir something the stomach to someone): to cause aversión.
    No lo trago (I don't swallow it): I can't bear with it.
    In English, we say somewhat similarly that "it makes my stomach turn."

    No lo trago or no me lo trago in Spanish can also mean "I don't believe you/I don't buy it."

    It is also said that something "is a bitter pill to swallow" if you don't want to accept it but must.
     
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    sheri_f

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I'd say it's transitive...

    Yes, but the usual form, at least in my area, it's the pronominal one (tragarse) so if you want to sound like a local, that would be the way to go.
    Good to know! I like tips like that. I just tend to think of the song "No eres para mí" by Fanny Lu. In it she says, "Eso no lo trago yo" which I've always taken as the transitive form of "I don't believe it," even though maybe she should have said either "eso no trago" or "no me lo trago" to refer to not buying it because no lo trago brings up the idea of not bearing something, as you pointed out. Do you have a take on that lyric in English?
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    I just tend to think of the song "No eres para mí" by Fanny Lu. In it she says, "Eso no lo trago yo" which I've always taken as the transitive form of "I don't believe it," even though maybe she should have said either "eso no trago" or "no me lo trago" to refer to not buying it because no lo trago brings up the idea of not bearing something, as you pointed out. Do you have a take on that lyric in English?
    I didn't know Fanny Lu. I see she's Colombian and within Colombia, she's caleña and they have some uses that are different from those of Spain. The version of the lyrics that I found online doesn't say eso no lo trago. It says y a él solo lo trago yo (and I'm the only one that can bear with him) and, on another verse, y hoy solo lo trago yo (and nowadays' I'm the only one that can bear with him). Although it's true that in both cases it could make sense believe him, you would need a Caleño or, at least, a Colombian to know if the meaning of believe him is the usual one in Colombia (or in Cali) for that expression or if it's as common as to bear with him.
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    anything like lying on the stomach?
    When something is really bothering you, when you're constantly worried about something, in Italian we say: "ho un peso sullo stomaco" = "I have a weight on my stomach". If things improve and you have no reason to worry amore, you can say: "mi sono tolto/ levato un peso dallo stomaco" = I got a weight off my stomach.
     

    sheri_f

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I didn't know Fanny Lu. I see she's Colombian and within Colombia, she's caleña and they have some uses that are different from those of Spain. The version of the lyrics that I found online doesn't say eso no lo trago. It says y a él solo lo trago yo (and I'm the only one that can bear with him) and, on another verse, y hoy solo lo trago yo (and nowadays' I'm the only one that can bear with him). Although it's true that in both cases it could make sense believe him, you would need a Caleño or, at least, a Colombian to know if the meaning of believe him is the usual one in Colombia (or in Cali) for that expression or if it's as common as to bear with him.
    I see. Very fair point and very well then! There are a few versions of her song lyrics floating around on the internet, but I've always heard, and have read as well, "eso no lo trago yo." Another option that occurred to me is that "eso..." refers to his lies and tricks, and she's saying that she can't bear it/that (not him).

    In English we also say "swallow your pride" when you have to behave with humility or do something you find degrading.

    The engineer had to swallow his pride and accept a job as a barista after losing his job.

    The Spanish equivalent should be "tragarse el orgullo."
     
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