to sway and settle itself rather than fight

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Kacy.H

Senior Member
Chinese
WechatIMG3.jpeg


Yes, No, or Not Given?
The builders of pagodas knew how to absorb some of the power produced by severe weather conditions.
I thought the answer was Not Given. But the correct answer is Yes.
I don't understand why 'to sway and settle itself rather than fight' means the same as 'to absorb some of the powder'

Anyone explain please.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The sentence says that the builders had techniques, and the confidence, to build tall structures. They allowed the structures to “sway and settle” - that would include movement from windy weather, wind can cause structures to sway.
    They did not “fight gravity” is more to do with the settling part.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The sentence says that the builders had techniques, and the confidence, to build tall structures. They allowed the structures to “sway and settle” - that would include movement from windy weather, wind can cause structures to sway.
    They did not “fight gravity” is more to do with the settling part.
    Thanks. But I still don't understand how 'sway and settle in a windy weather' means 'absorb some of the power produced by this type weather. Is this a kind of metaphor?
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I suspect that the "swaying" described here may have less to do with wind than it does with another of nature's forces: namely, earthquakes.
    I didn't understand 'absorb the power by severe weather conditions'. But now I think I get it. The structures wouldn't be able to sway without borrowing power from wind, would it?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I don't see any mention of "weather conditions" of any kind in the original. What I do see is a reference to "nature's forces." Weather is not the only force of nature -- and the reference to a modern skyscraper in Tokyo makes me think that the real problem for the architect was not wind, but earthquakes.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I don't see any mention of "weather conditions" of any kind in the original. What I do see is a reference to "nature's forces." Weather is not the only force of nature -- and the reference to a modern skyscraper in Tokyo makes me think that the real problem for the architect was not wind, but earthquakes.
    Thank you!
     
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