To tackle something (= deal with it successfully)

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
I read the previous threads on this subject but I have one last question. Does "tackle" convey the meaning of "dealing with/handling something" in a determined and vigorous way? Also, when we tackle problems/tasks/etc, are they usually difficult ones? "This hammer drill will tackle your DIY projects with ease." or "The government has failed to tackle the problem of homelessness."


What do you suggest
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    It simply means to "take on" or to try to deal with. The world "tackle" in itself does not necessarily imply any particular degree of vigor or difficulty.

    When I finish mowing the lawn, I'm going to tackle that pile of paperwork on my desk.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Thank you. Does it also imply that he is actually going to do it, or he will just try to? Handle and deal with might mean that the person will do it. I would not say "I am going to handle the pile of paperwork on my desk though." It sounds odd to me.

    Thanks :)
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If you tackle a problem, there is no guarantee of success. I usually think of it as meaning to try to deal with something.

    I suppose it does suggest that the problem is difficult, i.e. something to get to grips with. But problems are by nature difficult. :)

    (cross-posted with MuttQuad)

    I find the sentence about the drill strange. I would only use tackle of a person.
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    If you tackle a problem, there is no guarantee of success. I usually think of it as meaning to try to deal with something.

    I suppose it does suggest that the problem is difficult, i.e. something to get to grips with. But problems are by nature difficult. :)

    (cross-posted with MuttQuad)

    I find the sentence about the drill strange. I would only use tackle of a person.
    The drill reference is just advertising copy as a supposedly clever way of saying that with this drill you'll be able to handle your DIY projects more easily.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    If you tackle a problem, there is no guarantee of success. I usually think of it as meaning to try to deal with something.

    I suppose it does suggest that the problem is difficult, i.e. something to get to grips with. But problems are by nature difficult. :)

    (cross-posted with MuttQuad)

    I find the sentence about the drill strange. I would only use tackle of a person.
    It is not a self-made sentence though. I read it on Homebase's official website.
     
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