To take note/to make note

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volver

Senior Member
french belgium
Hello,

A: Come to my place anytime
B: Thank you. I take note or I make note.
Maybe I should add of it at the end? Can I use to make or to to take?

Thank you.

VOLVER
 
  • nataraja87

    Member
    English - American
    Both phrases should be tweaked. "I will take note" means I will pay attention. "I will make a note" means to write topics, thoughts, or facts down as an aid to memory.
    I hope that helps :)
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    You would not use "take" in this context but "I make note" has a couple of problems with it. Firstly, we would more naturally say "I will make a note of it". Secondly, in this casual context of someone inviting you to their home, "I'll make a note of it" sounds almost rude. It sounds like you're saying "Okay, I'll put that invitation into my computer notebook and if I ever get around to it, I might come."

    More naturally, in this context, we might say "Thanks for the invitation. I'll remember that."
     

    volver

    Senior Member
    french belgium
    Thank you but I said that he's invited me to his place but it's in fact a bar where people meet. He said something like you should come over sometime.
    I didn't know what to say when using to take note or maybe something else such as it's noted.

    I don't really know. Please help.


    VOLVER
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "to take a note" means to literally write notes. If I said, "Volver, please take a note for me about the meeting next Wednesday", I mean that I would expect you to write it down that I have an appointment next Wednesday.

    If, however, I said "Volver, please make a note that I have a meeting next Wednesday", I don't necessarily expect you to write it down - I simply expect you to remember about the meeting. Usually, "make a note" means remembering something whereas "take a note" means writing something down.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I'd say "thanks, I'll do that!"

    The comment about near-rudeness raised an interesting point. Why complicate an invitation by being evasive about whether you'll come? Saying "okay, I will" does not commit you to go.

    It's a little like "do I look fat in this?" I'd say yes even if I wasn't inclined to go.

    Uh...yes to the invitation, not the fat question.
     

    wsiabato

    Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Hi, I was looking for information about this topic, I found this thread but dimcl and nataraja87 suggested opposite meanings. So, I decided to find them out at the Oxford Dictionary. Here what the dictionary says:

    to make a note of sth = to write sth down
    take note = pay attention employers should take note of the needs of disabled people


    So, according to this, Nataraja87 is right!!
    "I will take note" means I will pay attention. "I will make a note" means to write topics
     
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