to take one's cherry

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DeeDol

Senior Member
Slovak
Hi,

would young people use the phrase "to take one's cherry" (meaning to take one's virginity) or is it rather old-fashioned?
 
  • DeeDol

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Thank you, sumelic. Could you be more specific? (Ridiculous how?)

    Maybe I should explain more. It appeared in a book written in British English, which I am supposed to translate. Two guys are speaking on the phone, cracking jokes, and one of them (he is from Cornwall, if that's any help:)) uses this phrase. I am wondering how to translate it into my language, and even though I know the meaning, I also need to be able to judge if there is any "colouring".
     
    "take his/her cherry" is a common, somewhat crude expression. Note it may be a)figurative or b)extended.

    ADDED:
    a)The former would apply in a non sexual situation. Recruits lost their cherry in the first battle.
    b)The latter would apply for sexual events that don't involve intercourse of male and female.
     
    Last edited:

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi DeeDol,

    Could you please give us the full English sentence in which it appears, so that we can see exactly how the speaker is using it? I'm a bit puzzled by your phrase being to take one's cherry, as "one's" implies "one's own." One can lose one's own cherry, but one can only take someone else's.:D
     

    DeeDol

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Thanks, everyone.

    The whole phrase in the context:
    ‘I never,’ said Strike (it was a joke of long standing), ‘shagged Gwenifer Arscott.’
    ‘Well, have another bash, Diddy, you might strike gold this time. Time someone took her cherry. And speaking of girls neither of us ever shagged…’
    Source: Robert Galbraith: The Silkworm

    theartichoke: you're right, maybe I should have written "to take someone's cherry". Should I (and can I) change it?

    From your answers above it seems that the phrase is either old-fashioned or at least really unusual. I'd be interested to hear more opinions:)
     
    Last edited:

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    The whole phrase in the context:
    ‘I never,’ said Strike (it was a joke of long standing), ‘shagged Gwenifer Arscott.’
    ‘Well, have another bash, Diddy, you might strike gold this time. Time someone took her cherry. And speaking of girls neither of us ever shagged…’
    Source: Robert Galbraith: The Silkworm
    I agree that the phrase is dated slang, and it makes sense in this context because it's part of a joke: nobody is really talking about taking Gwenifer Arscott's virginity, which may or may not exist (I'm guessing not, but I haven't read the novel). So the speaker is using an expression that everyone would understand but would also find slightly comic. Nobody would use the phrase seriously these days. So if there's a Slovak slang term for taking someone's virginity that would have been more common in, say, the 1950s, that might be your equivalent. Barring that, I would go for a term that's humorous, a bit crude but not too crude.

    (I don't know if you can change the title, and it probably doesn't matter, but you could ask one of the mods.)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "take his/her cherry" is a common, somewhat crude expression. Note it may be a)figurative or b)extended.

    ADDED:
    a)The former would apply in a non sexual situation. Recruits lost their cherry in the first battle.
    b)The latter would apply for sexual events that don't involve intercourse of male and female.

    I've only ever heard "popped her cherry"; never "taken..." [USA]
     
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