to take slight umbridge (umbrage)

  • Manwell

    Member
    French
    Thanks for your help.

    but I received a mail from a british colleague writing: "Sorry to take slight umbridge to this as i know it is meant with the best intentions"

    maybe the two versions exist? to take slight umbrage/umbridge

    This colleague is native of Shropshire, would it be a kind of local saying???

    anyway, I get what he means. Thanks
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    would it be a kind of local saying???
    My guess it is a slight typo. Either that, or your friend is a Harry Potter fan (which is why he had "idge" in his mind).

    There is a character in the fifth Harry Potter book named Mrs. Umbridge. She's an ugly, awful, trollish and rather shadowy creature who punishes people relentlessly, and manages to offend anyone she comes across.

    Author J.K. Rowling loves to play with words, giving the characteristics of a particular word to her characters, who she names similarly. I would guess this is a possibility.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The word is umbrage.
    I have seen umbrage in various forms before now.
    umbrage = offence

    There is nothing to suggest that umbridge is anything other than an error.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Manwell said:

    This colleague is native of Shropshire, would it be a kind of local saying???
    'Take umbrage' is not a local saying: if anything it is rather literary, so I don't think it has any local variants.
    There is no difference in pronunciation between 'umbrage' (correct spelling) and 'umbridge' (which is an incorrect spelling)
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    "Umbrage" usually has a humorous connotation, these days.

    If "I" say I have "taken umbrage at X", it has an air of self-deprecation or self-mockery: the offence is rarely to be taken seriously.

    If "I" say that MrQ has "taken umbrage at X", on the other hand, it implies that although MrQ may have taken X seriously, I probably have a rather humorous attitude towards the situation: perhaps I think that MrQ was a little silly to take offence.

    MrP
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    MrPedantic said:
    "Umbrage" usually has a humorous connotation, these days.

    If "I" say I have "taken umbrage at X", it has an air of self-deprecation or self-mockery: the offence is rarely to be taken seriously.

    If "I" say that MrQ has "taken umbrage at X", on the other hand, it implies that although MrQ may have taken X seriously, I probably have a rather humorous attitude towards the situation: perhaps I think that MrQ was a little silly to take offence.

    MrP
    I agree with this in every particular-- perhaps I should revise my pet topic of the mock-formal tone, and deemphasize the idea that it is quintessentially American. Clearly it's a part of our heritage, with roots going all the way back to "Anglo-Saxon irony"-- another of my pet topics.
    .
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    MrPedantic said:
    "Umbrage" usually has a humorous connotation, these days.

    If "I" say I have "taken umbrage at X", it has an air of self-deprecation or self-mockery: the offence is rarely to be taken seriously.

    If "I" say that MrQ has "taken umbrage at X", on the other hand, it implies that although MrQ may have taken X seriously, I probably have a rather humorous attitude towards the situation: perhaps I think that MrQ was a little silly to take offence.

    MrP
    If I may add to the sage words of MrP.
    The addition of 'slight' to the almost comical 'umbridge' (which is obviously just a misspelling of umbrage) removes the statement even one step further from any real offence taken.
    This is a gentle and friendly way to disagree.

    .,,
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    foxfirebrand said:
    I agree with this in every particular-- perhaps I should revise my pet topic of the mock-formal tone, and deemphasize the idea that it is quintessentially American. Clearly it's a part of our heritage, with roots going all the way back to "Anglo-Saxon irony"-- another of my pet topics.
    .
    Tick from the Celtic Fringe as well.
    I suspect that the mock-formal tone is alive and well in many places.
    I have no idea, but the suggestion that it may be quintessentially American prompts the thought that it is perhaps quintessentially colonial and provincial - a mechanism developed by those of us sufficiently distant from the pomposity of empire to recognise it.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    panjandrum said:
    Tick from the Celtic Fringe as well.
    I suspect that the mock-formal tone is alive and well in many places.
    I have no idea, but the suggestion that it may be quintessentially American prompts the thought that it is perhaps quintessentially colonial and provincial - a mechanism developed by those of us sufficiently distant from the pomposity of empire to recognise it.
    Is it possibly a mocking of the elite. The peasants poking fun at the rulers by affecting a cumbersome way of talking to point out that the rulers take umbrage at the peasants far too often.

    .,,
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    A hearty vote of agreement (thumps tankard on table) to the points made by Panj and .,,.

    Hmmm-- .,,, your monicker at the end of a sentence looks a little like Kilroy peering over the top of a fence.
    .
     

    sirNitti

    New Member
    vietnam
    Umbridge is a short, squat woman described as resembling a large pale toad. She has a broad, flabby face, little neck, and a wide, slack mouth. ...
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolores_

    I'm a callipygian! And I hate Umbridge!!
     

    Cader Idris

    Senior Member
    Wales English
    "Umbridge" is just a mis-spelling in my opinion.
    Yes, I agree.
    Since it is such a rare word, nowadays, many people will be a bit unsure of the spelling. It is more likely to be encountered in the spoken language than in the written one.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Unbridged" is a word. It means that the river or stream has no bridge to cross it.

    I would imagine that "umbridge" will someday be "correct".

    In our machine shop the toolmakers use "swedge" for "swage", primarily because "swage" is pronounced as "swedge". So I have low-hopes that "umbridge" will remain a misspelling.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I would imagine that "umbridge" will someday be "correct".
    Sadly, that's probably true.

    Americans in particular seem to corrupt unfamiliar words into more familiar spellings.

    The most egregious example I can think of is the nearly universal misspelling of chaise longue, which always seems to appear as "chaise lounge.":thumbsdown:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm not sure why you see your side of the pond as particularly culpable (inventive?) If J K Rowling is the source of "umbridge" then we claim her as ours! And there are plenty of "chaise lounges" over here, too. Purists are always, ultimately, the losers in language-change battles...

    Loob
     

    mally pense

    Senior Member
    England, UK English
    I take umbridge (sic) at the quoted author diluting the wonderful expression "to take umbrage" by adding "slight" to it. Completely ruins the sound and feel of it, though it's easy to see that the motivation was to avoid risking the person reading it taking umbrage themselves.

    By the way, I never realised it was spelt "umbrage"!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I take umbridge (sic) at the quoted author diluting the wonderful expression "to take umbrage" by adding "slight" to it. Completely ruins the sound and feel of it, though it's easy to see that the motivation was to avoid risking the person reading it taking umbrage themselves...
    My feeling exactly. In my opinion:

    "I take offense at what was said." :tick:

    "I take slight offense at what was said." :cross:

    "I find what was said was somewhat offensive." :tick:
     
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