to take someone in with one's breath

DeeDol

Senior Member
Slovak
Hi, this is from The Serpent Papers by Jessica Cornwell. What does the bold part mean?

The person saying this just drank a little wine, inhaling the scent and commenting on its taste. Now he says this:

Now –’ he smiles, taking me in with his breath – ‘I’m ready! You may ask me anything you want. For this evening I’m yours.’
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    taking me in -> assessing me personally; forming an opinion of me
    with his breath -> as he breathes inThe image is one of his drawing in the character of the other person through his nose.

    PS:
    The person (it would be helpful to expand such impersonal nouns) saying this just drank a little wine, inhaling the scent and commenting on its taste. (Where is this being said and to whom?) Now he (pronouns are not substitutes for a description) says this:
     

    DeeDol

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Thank you, Paul, and I'll bear the PS in mind. "He" is a murderer speaking to his next victim while cooking and drinking wine. Both of them know that he is about to kill her, so it is quite a strange situation.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Ah, that would have been most useful! I was going to add "with his breath -> as he breathes in, the image is one of his drawing in the character of the other person through his nose like an animal assessing its prey."
     
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