to take someone in with one's breath

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DeeDol

Senior Member
Slovak
Hi, this is from The Serpent Papers by Jessica Cornwell. What does the bold part mean?

The person saying this just drank a little wine, inhaling the scent and commenting on its taste. Now he says this:

Now –’ he smiles, taking me in with his breath – ‘I’m ready! You may ask me anything you want. For this evening I’m yours.’
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    taking me in -> assessing me personally; forming an opinion of me
    with his breath -> as he breathes inThe image is one of his drawing in the character of the other person through his nose.

    PS:
    The person (it would be helpful to expand such impersonal nouns) saying this just drank a little wine, inhaling the scent and commenting on its taste. (Where is this being said and to whom?) Now he (pronouns are not substitutes for a description) says this:
     

    DeeDol

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Thank you, Paul, and I'll bear the PS in mind. "He" is a murderer speaking to his next victim while cooking and drinking wine. Both of them know that he is about to kill her, so it is quite a strange situation.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Ah, that would have been most useful! I was going to add "with his breath -> as he breathes in, the image is one of his drawing in the character of the other person through his nose like an animal assessing its prey."
     
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