To take someone in

Frances029

Senior Member
France
Hi people,
need some help here. I'm not sure about the meaning of the second sentence.
A mother talks to her young son. It's the morning and she's yelling as he's still in his bedroom : " It's already gone eight. I am not taking you in !"
Il est huit heures passées. Ne compte pas sur moi pour t'emmener ??? thanks for your help.
 
Last edited:
  • Frances029

    Senior Member
    France
    If the context is one in which the mother might drive the son to school/work/whatever, then your interpretation certainly sound correct to me!
    I can't say for sure. But if it seems right for you I can assume it is what she talks about. Thanks Tochka.
     

    Tochka

    Senior Member
    I can't say for sure. But if it seems right for you I can assume it is what she talks about. Thanks Tochka.
    You're quite welcome. I can't imagine what else it would be. In fact, before seeing your suggested translation I wondered if there was some error in the original, but your thought makes perfect sense.

    When I first saw the title of the thread, two entirely different uses of "to take someone in" came to my mind--neither of which would work here:
    • to permit someone to come into your home to stay: "The kindly old lady took in the orphan waif." or
    • to deceive someone (usually heard in the passive): "Don't be taken in by his smooth talking!"
    But understanding "to take" in the sense of "emmener" and "in" as short for "in [to the city/to school/etc.]" would fit perfectly. So I think you must be right.
     

    learnenglishaaa

    Banned
    français
    J'ai un ''take in'', moi aussi. Mais le contexte est un peu différent :

    Woman: We can't thank you enough for taking Ryan in.

    En fait, Ryan a passé quelque temps chez les parents de Clark, ainsi que ce dernier, car il avait fui ses beaux parents. Je pense donc qu'on pourrait traduire la phrase ci-dessus de la manière suivante :

    ''Nous ne pouvons pas suffisamment / assez vous remercier d'avoir pris Ryan chez vous.''

    Je me trompe ou c'est juste?

    :)
     

    Nitroceline

    Senior Member
    français
    If the context is one in which the mother might drive the son to school/work/whatever, then your interpretation certainly sound correct to me!
    I think you are right. If he is on time, he will take the school bus. But if he is late, the mother will have to drive him to school. She is telling him that is better not to be late because she does not intend to drive him to school.
     

    Nitroceline

    Senior Member
    français
    J'ai un ''take in'', moi aussi. Mais le contexte est un peu différent :

    Woman: We can't thank you enough for taking Ryan in.

    En fait, Ryan a passé quelque temps chez les parents de Clark, ainsi que ce dernier, car il avait fui ses beaux parents. Je pense donc qu'on pourrait traduire la phrase ci-dessus de la manière suivante :

    ''Nous ne pouvons pas suffisamment / assez vous remercier d'avoir pris Ryan chez vous.''

    Je me trompe ou c'est juste?

    :)
    Je crois que vous avez raison.
     
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