To take the Michael

La_Nereida

Senior Member
Español - Inglés
Hi!

uff! Apparently I have lots of doubts ( or a lot of doubts) today ... Please someone help me ... What does this idiom mean? :confused:

"They won't come. Someone's taking the Michael. Forget all about it. It's a false alarm. A false alarm (...) "

And this one too, please: "all found" :D

"Berlin. A nightclub. Playing tha piano. A fabulous salary. And all found."

Cheers!

La NeReIdA
 
  • Kasquebrado

    Senior Member
    England
    To make fun of someone. Doing something for a joke/ for a laugh

    Burlarse de if an object.
    Sorry, I don't understand the second one.
    Kas
     

    cl109

    Senior Member
    Argentina - Español
    Hola! encontré esto en un foro de UK...espero te sirva.

    The proper expression is "taking the mickey". It is used a lot in the UK. It means to tease. More crudely, to take the piss out of someone....to tease them, not in a malicious way.

    Mickey is a variant of the name Michael, as is Mick. So just as a variation of saying "taking the mickey" some people say "taking the Michael", meaning to tease. They can also change the "taking" bit to "extracting", so "extracting the Michael" means exactly the same thing.

    If you suspect someone of teasing you or having you on, you simply say "Are you taking the mickey?" or "Are you taking the Michael?" or "Are you extracting the Michael?"
     

    cl109

    Senior Member
    Argentina - Español
    Otra explicación para "to take the Michael"

    It is an example of the quick turnover of Cockney slang.

    Partridge's "Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English" dates this expression to c. 1950, and gives its origin as rhyming slang ("Mickey Bliss"). Mickey Bliss, thought to be BBC radio personality, has never been conclusively identified. A competing theory is that "taking the mick" was derived from the verb, "micturate" (to urinate).

    From 'taking the piss' to 'taking the mick' to 'extracting the Michael' shows that the impetus is to obscure rather than explain, so that the hearer always has to work harder to get the meaning. But it is a game of invention between friends as much as a way of excluding outsiders. Once 'extracting the Michael' has become too commonplace within the group, for example, one might go for something like, 'Are you attempting to remove the Michaelangelo, sunshine?' (This last is not a real idiom – yet.)
     

    el_empollon

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish/English
    I agree with Kasquebrado. In BrE (I think), "to take the Michael" means to poke fun of someone. I've also heard "take the Mickey".

    I don't understand the "and all found" in that context, however. I figure it might mean all that comes along with doing those things.

    But that's a wild guess. Let's wait for more options.
     

    Kaia

    Senior Member
    Argentina -Spanish
    Maybe "all found" refers that all that was mentioned before was all in one, all melted into one thing? ( y todo eso en una sola cosa)
    To found> : to melt (as metal) and pour into a mold
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Whoa! Living in the Pacific NW and western US almost all my life, I've never heard the term! Must be BE, or I must be hanging around the wrong crowd, or I have my head buried in the sand. Learning all the time....
     

    el_empollon

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish/English
    mjscott said:
    Whoa! Living in the Pacific NW and western US almost all my life, I've never heard the term! Must be BE, or I must be hanging around the wrong crowd, or I have my head buried in the sand. Learning all the time....

    Hello,

    Just to let you know: it is BrE as a matter of fact. That's probably why you haven't heard it. They don't say it much here in Vancouver either, but I've seen it used at times by Australians [I don't know if it's common though].

    ¡Un saludo! ;)
     
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