to the yard

hecan68

New Member
spanish/spain
YARD IN THE DICTIONARIES

the question is if the expression 'a youth enjoyed her, to the yard'
makes any sense or has more than one meaning and if it is related to Shakespeare's poem Venus and Adonis or an allusion to any other classical work.

Moderator Edit: Please do not post more than 4 lines of copyrighted material. The actual question has been moved from post #4 into this opening post.

 
  • Tei Tetua

    Member
    UK + USA, English
    This is from Joyce's Ulysses, isn't it? (No, I'm not incredibly erudite. I've got Google, same as everyone.)

    My guess is that it means "thoroughly" in this context, but you can't be totally sure with that book.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    YARD IN THE DICTIONARIES

    the question is if the expression 'a youth enjoyed her, to the yard'
    makes any sense or has more than one meaning and if it is related to Shakespeare's poem Venus and Adonis or an allusion to any other classical work.

    Why Venus and Adonis?
    The word "enjoyed" does not appear there. Nor does the word "yard".

    You seem to be trying to pin this expression "to the yard" on Shalespeare, having wrongly sourced it yesterday to Love's Labour's Lost. What is the full problem you are grappling with here?

    It would appear that it comes from James Joyce's Ulysses, and so you may be assured that it alludes to something - at least to Joyce's mind. What that allusion might be is, as usual with Joyce's unexplaned writings, anyone's guess. I imagine it might refer to the reference to "by the yard" in LLL. It might refer to a youth inveigling a young woman to join him in a yard for some 'enjoyment' out of sight of her parents/guardians.
     
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