To Thomas, her laugh sounded <horribly> <horrible> like a growl.

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loviii

Senior Member
Russian
An example is from sound | meaning of sound in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English | LDOCE :
(1) To Thomas, her laugh sounded horribly like a growl.

First, it's not an idiom as "to feel strongly about/that" in feel very <strongly> <strong> about .

Second, as velisarius said in The laboratory smelled <strongly> <strong> of chemicals. : if we can replace "to sound" with "to be" – To Thomas, her laugh was horribly like a growl. – therefore "to sound" here is a copula (linking verb), therefore we must write an adjective after him rather than an adverb.

a) Why is "horribly" written here rather than "horrible"?
b) Can I say it with "horrible":
(2) To Thomas, her laugh sounded horrible like a growl.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "Horribly" modifies "like" there. Adverbs can modify other adverbs.


    To Thomas, her laugh sounded horrible like a growl.
    This would work with a comma before "like" and it would mean that her laugh sounded horrible and it was like a growl.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    This would work with a comma before "like" and it would mean that her laugh sounded horrible and it was like a growl.
    :thumbsup:
    And as adverb it means "... very much like a growl". But horribly still retains the connotation of "in a horrible way".
     
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