to trot out

KON

Senior Member
Goodmorning everyone,

I was wondering if someone could help me with this phrase

According to the dictionary, to trot out means to

  • to repeat information or ideas e.g. Politicians trot out the same speeches
  • To bring out someone or something to attention in order to admire it e.g. She trotted her coffee machine out this morning and made coffee
My question is; Can you use this expression to show off a person e.g. your boyfriend or girlfriend?

Does it sound right to say, Mike trotted out his girlfried at the ceremony?

Thanks a lot for your help
 
  • Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Absolutely. Especially if the person is objectified in your thoughts or if you consider him or her as a possession.
     

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I agree with Nun-Translator. For me it has the connotation of showing off a horse who trots round in a circle at a horse fair, on a rope held by the owner, so is not very complementary.
     

    KON

    Senior Member
    Interesting. I had never seen "trot out" used to mean "put someone on dislplay" before.
    Hi sound shift,

    Maybe it's more common in AE than in BE.

    Just to get another opinion, does the sentence "Mike trotted out his girlfried at the ceremony" sound right to you?

    Is it something a BE speaker would say instead of using the phrase "to show off" in this case?

    I've just found an article that "puts someone on display" in a metaphorical way
    "Obama says he won't trot out kids again for campaign"
    (http://www.youdecide2008.com/2008/07/09/obama-says-he-wont-trot-out-kids-again-for-campaign/)
     
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    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's not something I would say, KON, but I can't speak for all BE speakers. It may be AE in origin (I don't know), in which case some BE speakers may have adopted it (particularly the younger ones, whose speech is more influenced by AE than is the speech of the older generation). It may be native to BE, in which case my (non-)usage would seem to be an anomaly.
     
    Last edited:

    Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I´ve always used it in UK and I don´t belong to the young generation anymore ( :( ), but only in KON´s first sense of routinely doing something rather than showing something off.
    For example, "Blair´s always trotting out the same old excuse."
    I wonder if it is the second meaning that is american.
     
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