to turn back on something

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SAIP0

Senior Member
Latvian
Dear all,

I doubt understanding the following phrase correctly:

"Even in the adventure stories [..], the story, which begins as a simple series of adventures, turns into a mystery, and compels us to turn back on it, to reread its enigmas more attentively."

Could you, please, help me? Does it mean that the reader is compelled to start the story over in order to be able to understand what is actually happening?

Thanks in advance.

Regards
Saip0
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thanks. It is a slightly odd way of phrasing it, but I would read it as meaning that the reader has to go back to earlier parts of the book to re-read the enigmas - not necessarily to re-read the whole book. "it" refers back to "the story", which is rather far away in the sentence, which doesn't help understanding.

    PS. Another reason it's a little odd is that you tend to read it as a comma-separated list: which begins as a simple series of adventures, turns into a mystery, and compels us. I'd find it much clearer if it was the story, which begins as a simple series of adventures, turns into a mystery, compelling us ...

    Because it is not a comma-separated list, I find the comma before and compels us redundant.
     
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