to turn over in my head

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giraffe88

Senior Member
England, English
Salut,

Je n'ai aucune idée comment traduire 'to turn over in my head'. Est-ce qu'il y a une expression pareille ou dois-je utiliser 'réfléchir'?

Merci en avance!
:)
 
  • Donaldos

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Tu as une phrase complète?

    En parlant d'une idée par exemple, tu peux dire "ressasser".
     

    giraffe88

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Le narrateur parle des conseils que son pere lui a donné quand il était petit, et dont il ne cesse pas de penser depuis ce temps...

    'my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my head ever since'
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    It would be sooooooo nice to have a longer sentence (nay, a proper context!) to be able to hang one's thought on :rolleyes:, oh well [sighs…]

    I propose "rabâcher dans ma tête" (faute de mieux)
     

    giraffe88

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Ok! Full context - it's only a short passage for translation so I actually can't tell you much!

    "In my younger and more vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my mind ever since. 'whenever you feel like criticizing anyone,' he told me, 'just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had.' "

    Hope that helps!
     

    janpol

    Senior Member
    France - français
    en langage inspiré par les techniques modernes : ... qui tournent en boucle dans ma tête...
     

    giraffe88

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I'm also not quite sure how to translate 'ever since' the way it is used here, 'depuis' seems to require adding something like 'since that moment' ? Sorry to confuse two linguistic matters in one thread.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    My personal favourite is "turlupiner"! :)
    Yes :tick:, that is a really nice one, which I had forgotten: Ça me turlupine (les méninges) ;). Could you use it in a translation or is it only for colloquial use?
    I'm also not quite sure how to translate 'ever since' the way it is used here, 'depuis' seems to require adding something like 'since that moment' ? Sorry to confuse two linguistic matters in one thread.
    Orig: 'my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my head ever since'
    I offer: "Mon père m'a donné des avis, et depuis, je ne fais que de les râbacher dans ma tête (…que de les turlupiner dans ma tête)"
     

    Topsie

    Senior Member
    English-UK
    Mon père m'a donné un/des conseil(s) qui me turlupine(nt) dans la tête depuis.
    (This could probably pass orally, I'm not so sure about written tho', depending on what it's for!)
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Janpol has a good point. Conseils is much better. Is it correct to place "depuis" at the end of the sentence; it looks weird. What about my Q in post #10: is turpuliner colloquial?
     

    Donaldos

    Senior Member
    French - France
    In my opinion, "turlupiner" is too colloquial to be used here. Besides, the usual construction is "être turlupiné par quelque chose" :

    ça me turlupine = it's bugging me
     

    Eric75

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Réveil d'un vieux fil :
    " turlupiner " véhicule une idée d'obsession contrariante, qu'on n'a pas vraiment résolue (idée de "puzzle" en anglais). Ce n'est pas le sens de turn over ici, je pense...
    De plus, comme le dit Donaldos : je ne peux pas " turlupiner quelque chose ", mais quelque chose peut me turlupiner .
    => il y a donc plusieurs formulations inexactes dans ce fil.
    Je traduirais donc plutôt "my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my head ever since", par :
    " mon père m'a un jour donné un conseil qui est depuis resté gravé dans ma mémoire ".
     
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