To up and criticize

Poland91pl

Senior Member
Polish
Hello. What does UP mean as a verb.
Here's some context taken from a song in which a singer complains about her man
She sings " you're always so quick to up and criticize"
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    There is an AE expression "up and <verb>"
    A similar AE expression is "go and <verb>"
    They both basically mean "<verb>".

    The added part has no separate meaning. It adds a minor nuance that I don't understand. Not all Americans use these. I don't use them.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    'Up and <verb>' implies to me that the person is performing the action of the verb suddenly and surprisingly. For instance:
    He watched all the Lord of the Rings movies and next thing you know he up and moved to New Zealand.
    We were just chatting away like regular friends, and then she up and tells me she's had a crush on me since 2007.

    'go and <verb>' is similar but doesn't express the same sudden action.

    Another phrase I used to hear is 'take and <verb>.' It is used (was used?) like a short form of 'undertake to.' It doesn't mean physically take.
    '"Hey now, you got nothing to do? Take and mend these socks why don't you.'
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    'Up and <verb>' implies to me that the person is performing the action of the verb suddenly and surprisingly.
    :thumbsup:
    I was going to say "without warning" which is pretty much the same thing. It fits this scenario perfectly:
    We were just chatting away like regular friends, and then she up and tells me she's had a crush on me since 2007.

    The listener didn't see that coming at all.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    He watched all the Lord of the Rings movies and next thing you know he up and moved to New Zealand.
    You would leave up in the bare form (in the infinitive)? I would say 'he upped and moved' or 'he upped and left'.
    We were just chatting away like regular friends, and then she up and tells me she's had a crush on me since 2007.
    Similarly, I would say, 'then she ups and tells me ...'.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Similarly, I would say, 'then she ups and tells me ..
    I'm sure there's a semi-recent thread on this somewhere where those questions were discussed. People definitely had different ideas about normal usage. I don't remember if it was AE/BE differences or more mixed.
     

    Poland91pl

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'm sure there's a semi-recent thread on this somewhere where those questions were discussed. People definitely had different ideas about normal usage. I don't remember if it was AE/BE differences or more mixed.
    So is it "then he up and moved or" then he upped and moved "? :)
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    You would leave up in the bare form (in the infinitive)? I would say 'he upped and moved' or 'he upped and left'.

    Similarly, I would say, 'then she ups and tells me ...'.
    I would usually leave it in the 'bare form.' and I would say "up 'n" instead 'up and.'
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Hello. What does UP mean as a verb.
    Here's some context taken from a song in which a singer complains about her man
    She sings " you're always so quick to up and criticize"

    "Up", here, is used in an abstract way.

    In this sentence, "up" means that someone presents himself or herself in a way that everyone notices. "Up" is a location, and it's a location that everyone can see. When someone, or something, is "up", it's noticeable and out in the open.

    The verb "up" means that someone places himself or herself in an "up" location or position. And, in this location, everyone can notice that this person is criticizing something or someone.

    "Up" can also be taken to mean that someone suddenly moves and starts doing or saying something. Such a sudden move would attract attention, and that person would be very noticeable.

    However we look at it, "up" still means that a person is in a more noticeable location or position whether that's in an abstract sense or a physical sense.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top