'To walk faster' vs. 'To walk more quickly'

  • river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    We often use more and most, less and least to show degree with adverbs: He could move more quickly without shoes; Of the three brothers, Jack lies the most smoothly; She drives less confidently since the accident; He's the least likely to succeed.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    I can't say why, but when I read the options before viewing the thread, my initial impression was:

    Standling alone, without any other context:

    Walking faster conveys a suggestion of speed as perceived by others.

    Walking more quickly conveys a subtle hint of the intent of the walker.
     

    Moogey

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'd like to add that "Walk faster" sounds better and more natural than "Walk more quickly" if you want someone to speed up cause they're walking too slowly!

    -M
     

    lmarfell

    Member
    english, england
    this is a bit late, but i thought i would add..
    you wouldnt say "to walk more quickly" - you would say "to walk quicker".
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    lmarfell said:
    this is a bit late, but i thought i would add..
    you wouldnt say "to walk more quickly" - you would say "to walk quicker".
    I disagree. Quick is an adjective and not an adverb.

    "To which quicker" might be used colloquially, but "to walk quickly" is certainly not incorrect (in fact, it's the correct form).
     

    lmarfell

    Member
    english, england
    elroy said:
    I disagree. Quick is an adjective and not an adverb.

    "To which quicker" might be used colloquially, but "to walk quickly" is certainly not incorrect (in fact, it's the correct form).
    Ah, I see. Yes. I agree with you, actually. It's too easy to slip into colloquialisms that are, essentially, wrong! Thankyou for pointing that out.

    I just felt that "to walk more quickly" was a bit stiff and didn't think it would be used that much. I dont think it would be, actually. People would simply say "hurry up"!
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    lmarfell said:
    Ah, I see. Yes. I agree with you, actually. It's too easy to slip into colloquialisms that are, essentially, wrong! Thankyou for pointing that out.

    I just felt that "to walk more quickly" was a bit stiff and didn't think it would be used that much. I dont think it would be, actually. People would simply say "hurry up"!
    Or "pick it up a notch." ;)

    (I agree that "walk more quickly" would sound kind of stiff.)
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I don't know if there's a rule about this, but I would use "quicker" as a noun modifier: "He is definitely the quicker guard of the two candidates." And I'd use "more quickly" to modify a verb or an adverb. If you're giving a command, simply say, walk faster, speed it up, let's go, move it.
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    "To walk more quickly" would sooner come out of my mouth. I don't think it sounds stiff.

    Z.
     
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