to welcome at return

Ardalan

Member
Farsi
Bon voyage is a phrase borrowed from French which means "have a nice trip". If I am not mistaken this expression is used when somebody wants to go on a journey. I wonder what is the alternative expression we can say to somebody who has recently returned from a journey.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think it would be more typical to say: "I wish you bon voyage on your journey to England." (Americans would typically say "trip" rather than "journey". A journey in U.S. English usually has a connotation of a saga, like the Labors of Hercules. :) )
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    But that is said after returning from the journey. Right?
    Do you mean 'Welcome back' and 'Welcome home'?
    If so, yes, these are used on the return home.

    May I say: "Bon voyage to your journey to England"?
    Sorry, but this is not idiomatic British English.

    First of all, there is a problem with the preposition: we send people 'wishes' on the occasion of something, or sometimes, for an occasion.

    We are not wishing the trip anything,: we are wishing the people who are making the trip. For example: Best wishes to you on the occasion of /your trip/ your wedding/ your anniversary/ your success/ your promotion/ and so on. "On the occasion of" is a formula.

    Secondly, "Bon voyage!" is French for "Have a good trip!" Saying "Have a good trip on the occasion of your trip" is 'odd', as in 'peculiar', as in 'not idiomatic' as in 'wrong'. (Probably in any language).

    Hermione
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I have the feeling that Man is asking whether or not "Bon voyage to your journey to England" can be said to someone who's just returned from his trip to England. To which question I'd reply in the negative.

    GS
     

    Ardalan

    Member
    Farsi
    Thank you all. I need a little more clarification. If I have understood correctly, there is some kind of controversy regarding the appropriateness of using the expression "Bon voyage" to welcome somebody who has recently returned home. Am I right?
     
    Last edited:

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yes, I agree. I hope I didn't confuse things. I thought you were asking if you could use "Bon voyage to your trip to England" as someone left on a trip, not when they returned. I have never heard "bon voyage" used as a greeting on someone's return.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    No, that was a misconception. We never say "bon voyage" to someone who is returning.
    Hi.

    A friend of mine is in Taipei now. But I didn’t know that at all because yesterday she was still in my city. I was surprised to learn that. I then said to her “Bon voyage”. Is it natural to say to someone who’s already traveling? I know it’s perfectly natural to say to someone who’s about to travel.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    No, not really. In your context, you could say “Have a nice trip” or “Enjoy your travels/trip.”
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi.

    A friend of mine is in Taipei now. But I didn’t know that at all because yesterday she was still in my city. I was surprised to learn that. I then said to her “Bon voyage”. Is it natural to say to someone who’s already traveling? I know it’s perfectly natural to say to someone who’s about to travel.
    I'm sorry, I don't understand your context, Silver.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    I'm sorry, I don't understand your context, Silver.
    Hi Loob. Here's more information. I have a friend who traveled to Taipei, a city in Taiwan a few days ago. But the day before she traveled, she was still in my city, Chongqing. I was surprised to learn that she went to Taipei in one day. She showed some photos online, I added a comment under her photos: Bon voyage.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thank you, Silver.
    I agree with elroy. I'd have written "Have a good trip" or something similar.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    If Taipei is the destination of her trip, and she is already there, and is still there, I would not say Bon voyage, and neither would I say Have a nice trip, because that means basically the same thing. If anything, I'd say "Enjoy your time in Taipei", or perhaps "Enjoy the rest of your trip".
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    neither would I say Have a nice trip
    Since she just got there, “Have a nice trip” works for me, but I wouldn’t use it if she were in the middle of the trip. “Bon voyage,” though, doesn’t work for me at all if the person is already at their destination, even if they just got there.
     
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