to win out over (Wellington over Napoleon)

siares

Senior Member
Slovak
Hello all,
can I use 'to win out over' as in the following (attempt at translation of an one of collection of aphorisms about the famous by Feleki Laszlo)

Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, hg.: He will never be forgiven for winning out over Napoleon, as is evident from Waterloo being a symbol of defeat, rather than that of victory.

From dictionary definitions it could be that the verb is used for slow gradual success, so I'm not sure.

(I cannot use 'defeat' because of the second half; and 'triumph' because it isn't dry enough)

Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    can I use 'to win out over'
    No. To "win out over" is simply laughably informal/casual - you could use it as a joke, but, if this is serious, it is inappropriate for the context and/or tone.

    He will never be forgiven for his success against Napoleon

    Wellington, Arthur Wellesley, hg. -> what is "hg."?

    PS. I assume that you meant to preface this with "For the French, ..." ;)
     
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    siares

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Oh dear! I'm disappointed.
    PS. I assume that you meant to preface this with "For the French, ..." ;)
    Not at all - I know 'met her Waterloo' from Anne of Green Gables (a colonial:))
    I'd use -- win against, beat, vanquish...
    Beat and vanquish - no. The verb must be in discord with 'symbol of defeat'. (edited)

    (I don't know what's hg., it isn't explained in the book)
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The obvious choice is defeat but if you can't rephrase the symbol bit you could try "beating". Though I don't like it much. Triumphing over would be good, really.

    You really can't use "win out over" here.
     
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