To win the bugger outright

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by PAUL B.T., Jul 11, 2012.

  1. PAUL B.T.

    PAUL B.T. Senior Member

    ESPAÑA
    Spanish
    Seen on: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-18793244

    In a letter he asked the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to delay the award until he was 80, saying he was "still in the game and might win the bugger outright".

    Is it a (somehow) vulgar way for Mr. O'Toole to reject the honorary Oscar, believing that he could get one via his own merits? That's it: playing a role or something, not the honorary one.
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    It would only be considered mildly vulgar. By "outright" he presumably meant on his merits for acting in a specific picture, rather than just as an honorary tribute for his overall career.
     
  3. PAUL B.T.

    PAUL B.T. Senior Member

    ESPAÑA
    Spanish
    "Bugger" mildly vulgar? Wow! Hehe.
    http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=bugger

    Am I right (generalizing, I mean) if I say that from more politically correct to less correct when speaking, it goes like: U.K. >> Ireland >> Australia?
     
  4. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    In the US we don't associate the word "bugger" with "buggery" at all, so for us it's very mild, even a term of endearment, although not a common one. O'Toole is British, of course, so it may be slightly stronger for him.

    It's not uncommon for words that are offensive in one region to be much less so elsewhere, but I'm not sure how much you can generalize. In the US we tend to be fairly priggish, but on the other hand some words that might be problematic in the UK (like "fanny," which has a different meaning) are fine here.
     

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