to yield the floor

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
I don't understand what it means "yield the floor" in this context.
"Turn-taking cues are usually quite subtle. People do not simply stop talking when they are ready to yield the floor."
Thank you very much.
 
  • hus

    New Member
    Slovenian
    It means that a speaker has finished his speech so that the collocutor can proceed.
     

    Conan Doyle

    Senior Member
    Vietnam, English
    Hi,
    I don't understand what it means "yield the floor" in this context.
    "Turn-taking cues are usually quite subtle. People do not simply stop talking when they are ready to yield the floor."
    Thank you very much.
    "to yield the floor" refers to multi-person are talking at the same time.

    Let's see others' thoughts

    Conan
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    "Yield the floor" is a term used in formal meetings, or places like the US Senate. When the person who is speaking says she or he "yields the floor" to someone else, that person stops speaking to allow the other person to "take the floor" (start speaking).

    The same term is being used to talk about informal settings and what people do when they are ready to let someone else have a turn at talking. Apparently, the author thinks that whoever is speaking does more than simply stop talking to let the other person know it's her turn.

    This looks like an interesting article.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    IN those same formal meetings such as the Senate, a speaker may designate the person to whom he is going to yield. Eg., Mister, speaker at this time I yield the floor to the senior Senator from the State of Confusion, Senator Fuddle. The aim is to take a rest and give the floor to somebody who will agree with what you are saying.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Note that while you are in speaking, while you are in control of the debate, you "hold the floor".
    I suspect it relates to the "floor" of the formal debating chamber that cagey mentioned.
    In the UK Parliament, the floor of the house is often referred to. I believe this is true of the US.
    The floor of the House is the broad gangway which separates the two sets of benches in the House of Commons chamber. Crossing the floor is the term used to describe a Member of Parliament's decision to leave one political party to join another.
    Source
    Before legislation reaches the floor of the House, the Rules Committee normally passes a rule to govern debate on that measure.
    Source
     

    Ron Wolpa

    New Member
    english
    I´ve heard the term YIELD THE FLOOR many times on the movie ADVICE & CONSENT (OTTO PREMINGER) 1963 :
    SENATOR YIELD THE FLOOR and TO RECLAIM THE FLOOR.
     
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