today I am starting work

Peter SLP

Senior Member
Polish
Dear all,

I am not sure if my underlined phrase is correct.

"Normally I start work at 7 p.m. However, today I am starting work at 9 p.m. as I have an appointment with a doctor.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I thought that if I add a change to a schedule I should use 'Pr. Continuous' -I am starting..
    You have provided plenty of information about why you will start at a later time. There isn't any obligation to use the present continuous in your sentence. It sounds okay, but so does ...today I start work at 9 p.m.
     

    Peter SLP

    Senior Member
    Polish
    You have provided plenty of information about why you will start at a later time. There isn't any obligation to use the present continuous in your sentence. It sounds okay, but so does ...today I start work at 9 p.m.
    Today a native speaker from England told me that I should use "today I am starting at 9 p.m."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Today a native speaker from England told me that I should use "today I am starting at 9 p.m."
    There are hundreds of millions of native English-speakers, Peter. You don't expect all of us to share the same opinions about grammar and the appropriate use of words, do you?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi Peter SLP. as the previous posters have said, you can use simple present or present continuous for planned actions or timetabled events, so:
    Tomorrow I'm going to Warsaw, and next week I'm going to Paris. :tick:
    Tomorrow I go to Warsaw, and next week I go to Paris. :tick:
    In your example, a future time expression is given ("9 p.m.") so present simple is fine too.

    Talking about planned actions or events.
    To learn the English language well we have to see that there is not just one Future tense. There are a number of different ways to talk about future actions or events.
    The Simple present tense can be used to talk about future arrangements if a future time expression is also used, or it is understood from the context. (If there is no future time expression, people will usually understand the “habit” meaning.)
    Compare:
    Sandra starts work at 8:00. We understand that this is normal for Sandra
    John starts work at 10:00 on Friday. We understand that this is a special situation for this Friday, it is programmed and is seen to be a timetabled event. (learnenglishlanguagewell.com)
     

    Peter SLP

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hi Peter SLP. as the previous posters have said, you can use simple present or present continuous for planned actions or timetabled events, so:
    Tomorrow I'm going to Warsaw, and next week I'm going to Paris. :tick:
    Tomorrow I go to Warsaw, and next week I go to Paris. :tick:
    In your example, a future time expression is given ("9 p.m.") so present simple is fine too.
    Thanks!
     
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