toes to the nose

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Robin is trying to get to the Phantom Zone Projector, which is inside the Atomic Cauldron, and follows Batman's instructions given to him online as Batman watches him on the screen of his device. Robin is using a kind of a skateboard with an engine.
BATMAN: Now, let's ride. Toes to the nose. [Robin jumps, makes a backflip, kicks an enemy robot, and lands on the board again] Now you're gleaming the cube.
The LEGO Batman Movie

What does "toes to the nose mean"? I only found "toes on the nose", but am still not sure what it means. Does "nose" here mean the front edge of his board?

NOSE
the front end of an aircraft, car, or other vehicle
■ a projecting part of something the
nose of the saddle
Thank you.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'd never heard of "toes on the nose", but according to the surfers’ apparel company of that name, it relates to “the classic maneuver of the surfer's toes hanging off the edge of the surfboard”. So it seems likely that “Toes to the nose” is the same idea applied to a motorised skateboard!
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Does "nose" here mean the front edge of his board?
    Probably. That would be a natural meaning. If so, the expression means something like:

    1. Stand on the skateboard with your feet near the front (your toes near the nose of the skateboard) or your feet pointing forward (the toes of your feet pointing to the nose of the skateboard).

    But, based on the action Robin does right after hearing this, perhaps it means:

    2. "Kick that robot in the face". (apply your toes to the robot's nose)

    Either way, "toes to the nose" rhymes, which is always a good thing for Batman to do.:)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I'd never heard of "toes on the nose", but according to the surfers’ apparel company of that name, it relates to “the classic maneuver of the surfer's toes hanging off the edge of the surfboard”.
    That maneuver is called "hanging ten", and has been since the 60s. It's even in wikipedia. What is this 'apparel company', a bunch of furriners?:eek: Okay, maybe there's a new expression. We can allow a new expression every 30 years or so...:p
     
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