toggle from a single handhold to a single foothold

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Jeepster

Senior Member
Ideally, tie four Prusik knots to use as hand- and footholds, as when shimmying up the line. In the event that supplies are limited (if using shoelaces in the case of escape), two knots are enough to toggle from a single handhold to a single foothold.

100 Deadly Skills. Clint Emerson

Cannot visualize why the author has taken this word. Who does toggle anh HOW?
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's an odd use of "toggle", and I don't think it makes sense. As far as I can understand it, the writer is suggesting that one Prusik is used as a hand hold, the other as a foot hold. That would be a strange way of Prusiking. Perhaps you could provide context so we can tell what his 4 Prusik knots are being used for.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hmm. I'd like to know how he slides his footrest Prusiks up the rope without taking a hand out of one of the top loops. I'd also love to see him retying his Prusiks round a drainpipe whilst using one hand to hold on - maybe he holds on with his teeth :). The writer has completely missed the point of Dr Prusik's clever idea. You only need two Prusik loops to climb a rope, and the rope is not pulled taut.

    I've just realised what he means by "toggle". He means alternating between putting the climber's weight on the footloop and on the handloop. "Toggle" as in turning a switch on and off. It's not only a misuse of the word "toggle", it's also an impossible way of climbing a rope.
     

    Jeepster

    Senior Member
    Hmm. I'd like to know how he slides his footrest Prusiks up the rope without taking a hand out of one of the top loops. I'd also love to see him retying his Prusiks round a drainpipe whilst using one hand to hold on - maybe he holds on with his teeth :). The writer has completely missed the point of Dr Prusik's clever idea. You only need two Prusik loops to climb a rope, and the rope is not pulled taut.

    I've just realised what he means by "toggle". He means alternating between putting the climber's weight on the footloop and on the handloop. "Toggle" as in turning a switch on and off. It's not only a misuse of the word "toggle", it's also an impossible way of climbing a rope.
    I suspected something like that )
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I never used a Pursik, but I have used mechanical ascenders and this description makes perfect sense to me. There are videos on line that show how the mechanical ascenders are used.

    Mechanical ascenders, I was told, was quicker and easier to use and required fewer knot tying skills.

    I don't think I am allowed to link videos, but if you Google the YouTube "Big Mountain Adventure How to Ascend a Rope" You will find a pretty good one and once watched the toggle action will be understood.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The essential difference between Prusiking (knots or mechanical ascenders) and the diagram in Jeepster's post is the rig - as in the diagram in my post, the load is taken alternately on the body sling and one leg. The hands take no climbing load, they merely move the knots or the mechanical ascenders up the rope. Trying to climb on a hand loop and a foot loop would be impossible. Here's a diagram of how you do it with Prusik knots - alternating the load between foot and body harness.

     
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