Tom and Mary got an A and a C on the exam, respectively.

Overheather

Member
Japanese-Tokyo
Hello!
I'm confused about this sentence "Tom and Mary got an A and a C on the exam, respectively.".
Does this sentence mean Tom got an A and a C on the exam, and so did Mary? or, Tom got an A and Mary got a C?
Thank you in advance!
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    But beware when using "respectively": there must be the same number of things as there are people. You can't say "men and woman should wear trousers, skirts and dresses respectively". Who wears the dresses :confused:.
     
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