Tom has quite a lot of gold.

britneyM

Banned
Japan Japanese
My dictionary says the meanings of s1 and s2 are, in American English, almost the same.
s1: Tom has quite a lot of gold.
s2: Tom has quite a little of gold.

The meaning of s1 is easy for me to understand.
But I don't undestand why s2 means s1. I think "a little" is quite different from "a lot."
Why s2 means s1?
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "Quite a little of gold" doesn't sound right to me. "Quite a bit of gold," though, would mean more or less the same thing as "quite a lot of gold."
     

    reveur78

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    "Quite a little of gold" doesn't sound right to me. "Quite a bit of gold," though, would mean more or less the same thing as "quite a lot of gold."
    I agree with Elroy in that "quite a little" doesn't sound right.

    I think the 2 expressions are slightly different, and "quite a lot" is a greater quantity than " quite a bit".
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    My dictionary says the meanings of s1 and s2 are, in American English, almost the same.
    s1: Tom has quite a lot of gold.
    s2: Tom has quite a little of gold.

    The meaning of s1 is easy for me to understand.
    But I don't undestand why s2 means s1. I think "a little" is quite different from "a lot."
    Why s2 means s1?
    Get a new dictionary!
    Tom "has quite a lot of gold"" means he has an abundance of gold.
    Tom "has quite a little of gold" makes no sense.
    However, you can say this: Tom has quite a few gold bars/nuggets/coins etc. I think that dictionary is confusing "little" with "few".
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I think the 2 expressions are slightly different, and "quite a lot" is a greater quantity than " quite a bit".
    Not really. They are both vague and simply indicate that the person has a lot of whatever. It's not like if Person A has $10,000 and Person B has $20,000 I can't say that Person A has "quite a lot of money" and that Person B has "quite a bit of money." I could use either expression for either person.
     
    Last edited:

    britneyM

    Banned
    Japan Japanese
    I see.

    I think you say s1 and s3 are, in American English, almost the same.
    s1: Tom has quite a lot of gold.
    s3: Tom has quite a bit of gold.

    The meaning of s1 is easy for me to understand.
    But I don't undestand why s3 means s1. I think "a bit" is quite different from "a lot."
    Why does s3 mean s1?
     

    britneyM

    Banned
    Japan Japanese
    Thank you very much for your clear replies.

    I understand well.
    They say "When in Rome, do as the Romans do."
    Yes, I will.

    Thank you.
     
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