toma que toma

  • Mirlo

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
    I heard it in a song and it said: toma que toma su chocolate....

    In this context it means: Drinkink and (more) drinkink his chocolate....
    I hope this help,
     

    Antpax

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain
    Hola:

    Sería importante conocer el contexto, pero de forma general "toma que toma" (="dale que dale"), significa sin parar, sin descanso.

    Ant.
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    Hola:

    Sería importante conocer el contexto, pero de forma general "toma que toma" (="dale que dale"), significa sin parar, sin descanso.

    Ant.
    It could be also like antpax pointed out, I think more context will help more in order to have a better translation
     

    Fernita

    Senior Member
    castellano de Argentina.
    Chocolate here refers to chocolate milk, I believe.

    That´s why I´d use drink.

    Yes, anyway we need more context. I don´t know where adoro mi dios has gone.

    Hellooooooo, we need more context, hiiiiiii ...
     

    Fernita

    Senior Member
    castellano de Argentina.
    Anyway, I don´t know the song so it could also mean what Antpax says.
    Thanks Mirlo.

    Who knows?

    We should wait for adoro mi dios to tell us more about this. What is it that those kids take and take ???
     

    Blower's daughter

    Senior Member
    Spanish London
    Hi guys, I disagree with you all hahaha. Toma que toma is a very tipical andalusian expression. Singers use that expression in their lyrics, it doesn't have any meaning in particular, overall in flamenco pop music at the same time that you dance. I'm from Andalucía ;) ( South Spain)

    Here you have a lyric:

    Que calor que calor tengo
    que guapa soy que tipo tengo
    toma que toma,pero que toma que toma, pero toma que toma, tomaquetó

    Espero que ayude.
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    Hi guys, I disagree with you all hahaha. Toma que toma is a very tipical andalusian expression. Singers use that expression in their lyrics, it doesn't have any meaning in particular, overall in flamenco pop music at the same time that you dance. I'm from Andalucía ;) ( South Spain)

    Here you have a lyric:

    Que calor que calor tengo
    que guapa soy que tipo tengo
    toma que toma,pero que toma que toma, pero toma que toma, tomaquetó

    Espero que ayude.
    I also know this song, (it was a little bit popular in México a few years ago) and I always thought that it was like Dale que dale or a expression for cheer up.
     

    Blower's daughter

    Senior Member
    Spanish London
    Yes it can mean dale que dale, it is the same. You can also say 'El estaba toma que toma con que quería ese coche' He was insisting too much in that he wanted that car'. But in the context of a flamenco pop song it doesn't have any meaning in particular, it is just an expression.

    ;)
     

    Miguelillo 87

    Senior Member
    México español
    Yes it can mean dale que dale, it is the same. You can also say 'El estaba toma que toma con que quería ese coche' He was insisting too much in that he wanted that car'. But in the context of a flamenco pop song it doesn't have any meaning in particular, it is just an expression.

    ;)
    Guau, Digo esa expresión de la cual diste ejemplo Blower’s, es igualita a la mexicana “Chingue que chingue”, Creo que por lo menos yo ya le entendí 100 % .
     

    madrileño13

    New Member
    English
    In Madrid, we use "toma que toma" with friends to mean "get what you get" or "do what you do" or "get you some". Mainly the last one I think is what they say in the US. It's very colloquial. Anyone agree?
     

    Anniuska

    Member
    Spanish
    En España existe otra expresión similar a "toma que toma" o "dale que dale", y es "dale que te pego" para indicar insistencia de forma pesada con algo. Ejemplo :esta chica está todo el día "dale que te pego" con lo mismo.
    Yo estoy de acuerdo en que el origen de "toma que toma" y "dale que dale" viene de animar a cantar y a bailar el flamenco, generalmente acompañando con las palmas. Su significado es como decir "toma ya! que bién lo hace o lo baila!, sigue sigue que lo bailas fenomenal!
     

    werta

    Member
    Polish
    I am living now in Andalusia and our salsa and bachata teacher uses this expression when we are suppose to continue doing the same step for 2 bars... So it would match to 'sin parar', right?
     
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