Tomorrow, <it> will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.

Creature from the Sun

Senior Member
Russian, K-Paxian
Dear Gurus, if the question is:
'What will the weather be like tomorrow in Oxford?'
Is it grammatically correct to answer 'Tomorrow, it will be warm and cloudy in Oxford. ' ?
Can we omit 'it', saying just 'Tomorrow, will be warm and cloudy in Oxford. '?
Thank you!
 
  • LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    'Tomorrow will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.' (Remove the comma and the sentence is correct. Tomorrow is now the subject and there is no comma needed between the subject and the verb.)
     

    Creature from the Sun

    Senior Member
    Russian, K-Paxian
    'Tomorrow will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.' (Remove the comma and the sentence is correct. Tomorrow is now the subject and there is no comma needed between the subject and the verb.)
    Thank you, LVRBC. You mean, that both sentences
    A.Tomorrow, it will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.
    and
    B. Tomorrow will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.
    are correct but have different subject: for (A) the subject is 'weather' (represented by 'it') and for (B) the subject is 'tomorrow'? So, we can use the same logic for yesterday/today/tomorrow to say that 'yesterday was ...' / 'today is ...'/ 'tomorrow will be ...' + warm/hot/rainy/cloudy and in such a case , if we say 'Yesterday was hot. ' it means that 'the exact day (yesterday) was hot', and if we say 'Yesterday, it was hot.' we mean that the weather was hot, right?
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I would not say that.
    Will it be warm in Oxford tomorrow?
    Yes, it will be warm and cloudy.

    [if anyone can be so sure, of course - although they are much better at guessing these days, with all the satellites and stuff that help them]
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree with Paul that both work but the punctuation has to change.

    Interestingly, I don't think "it will be warm and cloudy" is nearly as idiomatic as "it will be cloudy and warm". At least to my ear.
     
    Last edited:

    Creature from the Sun

    Senior Member
    Russian, K-Paxian
    I agree with Paul that both work but the punctuation has to change.

    Interestingly, I don't think "it will be warm and cloudy" is nearly as idiomatic as "it will be cloudy and warm". At least to my ear.
    Got it! 'Tomorrow will be cloudy and warm in Oxford. '/ 'Tomorrow, it will be cloudy and warm in Oxford.'
    Thank you, kentix!
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Everyone has a separate take on this, but the bottom line is:
    'Tomorrow will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.' ( no comma) is correct, but for some reason Kentix prefers a different word order. (I have no preference, and can see no difference, and we both live in the same English-speaking country.) Boozer, who claims his first language as Bulgarian, is mistaken in his claim that the word "it" is required. Creature from the Sun remains patient and courteous - thank you.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Boozer, who claims his first language as Bulgarian, is mistaken in his claim that the word "it" is required.
    :) Well, I was looking at the initial post, containing a correct sentence
    'Tomorrow, it will be warm and cloudy in Oxford. ' ?
    and then seeing the good sentence spoiled
    'Tomorrow, will be warm and cloudy in Oxford. '
    my instinctive reaction was a big 'no' :D

    However, I must admit that even if the comma is removed and the sentence becomes acceptable, I still find it... I am not sure. :confused: I just do not quite like it - 'tomorrow' is mostly an adverb [although it can be a noun as well].
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    By the way, when I saw the thread, there were no other replies before mine. But I see it was a duplicate thread and the question had been answered already and then the two threads were merged so it now appears I was arguing with you. I was not. :)
     

    Creature from the Sun

    Senior Member
    Russian, K-Paxian
    Everyone has a separate take on this, but the bottom line is...
    Thank you, LVRBC! :)
    As far as we agreed that both
    A. Tomorrow, it will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.
    and
    B. Tomorrow will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.
    are correct
    and the question to (A) is 'What will the weather be like tomorrow in Oxford?'
    can we assign the question 'Will tomorrow be warm in Oxford?' to the answer 'B. Tomorrow will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.' ?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    A. Tomorrow, it (= the weather) will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.
    and
    B. Tomorrow (= the day following this one) will be warm and cloudy in Oxford.
     
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