Tonight, The Crimson Moon kills

Myriad

New Member
Spanish - Dominican
Hey, could someone help me a bit with the above phrase?
Its supposed to mean something close to:

Tonight, The Crimson Moon kills

It is correct? Also, is there a way to refer to 'Crimson Moon' as something living, beside obviously saying that it kills? How would the meaning change if I wrote wa instead?

I bet at least one will get the reference ;p
Sincere thanks for helping!!!
 
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  • bigdummy

    Senior Member
    inglés (por descuido)
    hola,

    me parece una contrucción basada en la lengua antigua escrita, y creo que la "ga" no denota el sujeto, sino posesión
    こよいが赤い月 = 今夜の赤い月
    asi que no se podría sustituir ga por wa en esta frase
     

    Noamoxkaltontli

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Hello Myriad, welcome to WordReference.

    Can you please provide a little bit more context? Like where did you read or heard this phrase from, who is the speaker, who is the recipient, and what is the situation like?


    Hola Myriad, bienvenida o bienvenido a WR,

    ¿Nos podrías dar un poco más de contexto por favor? Por ejemplo, de dónde sacaste ésta frase, quien la está diciendo, a quién, en qué situación.

    Thanks in advance.
     

    Myriad

    New Member
    Spanish - Dominican
    I didnt heard it anywhere, I was just trying to construct a sentence for a project of sorts in my school (a tshirt with a custom design)
    Situation-likewise... Is supposed to be someone making an observation about the moon to himself.

    Is that enought context? =s
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    The reading こよい for 今夜, though correct, is unusual. こんや is more frequent, unless you want to refer to some old Japanese play ...    
     
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    Myriad

    New Member
    Spanish - Dominican
    So gathering what you two have said, it is correct to write

    今夜の赤い月ころす
    which would mean something close to "Tonight's Crimson Moon kills"?

    Edit: Isnt it possible to reverse, to make it not sound as if its something habitual or ordinary?
    like changing the order of what comes after and before の?
     
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    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Hello,

    There are two more questions before reaching the final redaction. What do you mean by "kills" in your copy? Do you mean a murderous act is about to happen such as thrashing a knife? Or is it a more symbolic killing as in "Passive smoking kills" or "Love kills"? If the latter is the case, you must explain what deadly effect you observe in the moon. It's not a phrase that has a literal translation in Japanese.

    Do we per chance misunderstand the moon entirely? Is it a group of people whose name is the Red Moon? This makes your "way to refer to 'Crimson Moon' as something living" more understandable. Or do I misconstrue?

    Edit:
    moderator note
    Thread titles must be well-formed sentences in any language. Please do not create one out of your translation if you are not 100% sure it's correct. Use the original sentence instead.
     
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    Myriad

    New Member
    Spanish - Dominican
    Now that you mention it, I did forgot to say i didnt mean Kill as in literal killing... Is something more indirect, like your example 'passive smoking kills'

    But yea, red moon refers both to the literal moon in the few times it becomes redder in appearence, and to a certain character from a certain story, hence why I wanted to write it as if the moon was living.
     

    Noamoxkaltontli

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    おめでとうございます on your 5000+posts, Flaminius!
    命取り is above my level of understanding but it sounds very cool, fit for printing on a t-shirt.

    Myriad:

    だ is an informal copula. To put it simply, it is word that signals the end of the phrase. There are other copulas in Japanese, like です, which is the formal one.
    Good luck!
     

    Myriad

    New Member
    Spanish - Dominican
    Ill bother you with this for the last time so bear with me =p
    This is really about the translation of the two sentences you guys came up with..

    今夜は赤い月が殺すのだ。 (On this evening, the Crimson Moon kills)

    今夜の赤い月は命取り (The night of the Crimson Moon is fatal(takes life?))

    Also, thanks for all your help...
    I really feel i know a little bit more of japanese ^^
     

    Noamoxkaltontli

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    今夜の赤い月は命取り (The night of the Crimson Moon is fatal(takes life?))

    Also, thanks for all your help...
    I really feel i know a little bit more of japanese ^^
    Mine was really simple, you got it right :D

    You have the possesive relationship backwards on the second one, though. Also, since Flaminius said the moon was not given human characteristics in that sentence, it must be something like:

    "Tonight's red moon will be fatal (for someone)."

    There are also different words in Japanese for Red and Crimson, if you are particular about Crimson, you can replace 赤い for 紅 (kurenai).
     

    Myriad

    New Member
    Spanish - Dominican
    Mine was really simple, you got it right :D

    You have the possesive relationship backwards on the second one, though. Also, since Flaminius said the moon was not given human characteristics in that sentence, it must be something like:

    "Tonight's red moon will be fatal (for someone)."

    There are also different words in Japanese for Red and Crimson, if you are particular about Crimson, you can replace 赤い for 紅 (kurenai).
    Sorry, It seems i unwillingly lied about leaving you guys alone =/
    Following what you say, if I rearrange things a bit...

    赤い月の夜は命取り

    ...and take off that first kanji that specifies the time as present...

    Would it be right? (The night of the red moon will be fatal)
    Would it even be a correct phrase?
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    おめでとうございます on your 5000+posts, Flaminius!
    命取り is above my level of understanding but it sounds very cool, fit for printing on a t-shirt.
    Thank you, Noam, for your congratulations.
    命取り can be both murderous or fatally captivating. The second sense is already obsolete as a metaphor but similes will be understood.
     

    lammn

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese
    Another word for "red moon" is レッドムーン, but the kanji 赤い月 is preferable.

    akai - red
    kurenai - granate or sort of.
    Dictionary defines 紅 as "bright/deep red" or "crimson".

    I don't know how granate exactly looks like.
    Do you have a colour scale showing how granate differs from the other red colours?

    I check another dictionary which has a colour scale showing how red, crimson and other red colours look like, but it does not show the colour "granate".

    命取り can be both murderous or fatally captivating. The second sense is already obsolete as a metaphor but similes will be understood.
    It would be fun to wear such a T-shirt. :D
     

    lammn

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese
    Thanks for the link, Demurral!

    It's quite difficult to be distinguished by the naked eyes, though.
    There are different shading of red colours that are also called "granate" in the link you provided...
     

    Noamoxkaltontli

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    I think both can take でしょう or だろう at the end, with the nuance that it implies.

    In the case of my try I think would have to eliminate the の particle (alongside with the だcopula of course) to avoid making it sound too much like a request for an explanation.
    In short:

    今夜は赤い月が殺すのだ ⇒ 今夜は赤い月が殺すでしょう

    Phrased like this, though, my take does sound (to me) like 赤い月 is a nickname for a person or the name of an organization.
     
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