too wrapped up in Jules or trying to be one of the lads

Tea Addict

Senior Member
Republic of Korea Korean
Hello everyone. I would like to know what "too wrapped up in Jules or trying to be one of the lads" means in the following sentences:

‘Charlie,’ Johnno says. ‘You are joining us?’
‘Charlie,’ I whisper, trying to catch my husband’s eye. He’s barely looked my way all evening, too wrapped up in Jules or trying to be one of the lads. But I want to get through to him.

- Lucy Foley, The Guest List, Chapter 16

This is a thriller novel published in 2020 in the United Kingdom. One hundred and fifty guests gathered at some remote and deserted fictional islet called Inis an Amplóra off the coast of the island of Ireland to celebrate the wedding between Jules (a self-made woman running an online magazine called The Download) and Will (a celebrity appearing in a TV show program called Survive the Night). The day before the actual wedding day, at the rehearsal dinner, Hannah, the wife of Charlie (Jules' friend) tries to deter her husband from joining others' drinking game, because she knows he changes into a different person when he is drunk.

In this part, I am confused about the structure of the boldfaced phrase and just wanted to ask you.
Is it "He was too wrapped up in Jules, or too wrapped up in trying to be one of the lads"?
Or, is it "He was too wrapped up in Jules, or he was trying to be one of the lads"?

In short, I am wondering whether the effect of "two wrapped up in" stops at "Jules," or is still applicable to "trying to be one of the lads."

I would very much appreciate your help. :)
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Too wrapped up in" could apply to both "Jules" and "trying to be one of the lads", or just to "Jules". I am pretty sure it is meant to be the latter, but both readings are grammatical and plausible.
     

    Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear Uncle Jack,

    Thank you very much for the explanation!
    Reading your explanation, it really seems that the option where "too wrapped up" is only applied to Jules is more plausible, though both readings may be grammatically correct.
    I truly appreciate your help, as always. :)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Wrapped up" is a better fit for a romantic attraction than for trying to be friends with guys.
     

    Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear kentix,

    Thank you very much for the explanation.
    So "wrapped up in" is more suitable to romantic contexts, and so it would be more natural that the expression is related to only the "Jules" part!
    Perhaps the degree of intensity that "wrapped up in" conveys is more suitable to romantic relationships.
    I truly appreciate your help. :)
     
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