toodle-loo

jemappelleK80

Senior Member
[...]
En tout cas, ce n'était pas ma question au début, ma vrai question est suivante:

est-ce que quelqu'un sait si cette expression-là était le bas (je manque d'un meilleur mot) de l'expression américaine, "toodle-loo"?

Merci pour vos réponses!

~K
 
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  • Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    [...]
    Pour les liens avec toodle-loo, je n'en sais rien.

    Toodle Loo was used in 1938.
     
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    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    I like this one:
    The Loop is a very famous area in the City of Chicago and there is an old story about the man who gets on the bus and asks the bus driver, "Does this bus go through the Loop? To which the driver replies, "No, but it does go beep, beep!"
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    I found this : there

    As we like to say, we normally leave enlightenment to the Buddha, but we'll see what we can do. Toodle-oo was originally tootle-oo and first appeared in writing between 1905 and 1907. There are several theories as to its origin:

    1. It comes from the word tootle meaning "to depart", which itself comes colloquially from toddle "to walk sometimes", as a toddler does;

    2. It is a Cockney corruption of French à tout à l'heure "I'll see you soon"; or

    3. It arose as an onomatopoeic imitation of the old bulb-blown horns found on early motor cars (like the one that Harpo Marx used so effectively), which were often sounded on departing.

    We like theory number two, but we must be careful with French-phrase-based derivations. Many people were certain that barbecue came from French de la barbe à la queue ("from the beard to the tail") but, while that sounds entirely plausible on its face, it is absolutely not true (see Issue 10's Spotlight).
     

    Sillygirl

    Member
    French Canada
    i got another question for you all ... What "toodles" mean ? My friend told me " bye bye, toodles, XxxXkissesXxxX....." I really dont have a clue of what it could mean....

    thanks a bunch for your help :)

    have a nice evening !
    Sillygirl
     

    Kelly B

    Curmodgeratrice
    USA English
    I don't know the origin, but it is used interchangeably with tootle-oo, sometimes with ta ta. It's just a silly way to say goodbye. Au revoir, salut, bisous... (?)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    i got another question for you all ... What "toodles" mean ? My friend told me " bye bye, toodles, XxxXkissesXxxX....." I really dont have a clue of what it could mean....

    thanks a bunch for your help :)

    have a nice evening !
    Sillygirl

    Je crois que c'est un peu l'équivalent de notre "tourlou" .. dont ne ne connais pas l'origine non plus. :)
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't know the origin, but it is used interchangeably with tootle-oo, sometimes with ta ta. It's just a silly way to say goodbye.

    A friend asked me about the origins of toodles the other day, inquiring whether it came from "à tout à l'heure"; apparently, it does!

    According to the wise folks at Yahoo, toodles derives from toodle-oo [something I used to actually say ;) !], itself a bastardization of à tout à l'heure. See: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1006051013914

    Do you all agree?

    Laura
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    I do agree with this theory, because "toodle-oo" sounds so much like "tourlou", which we say in Quebec to mean « à tout à l'heure / à bientôt ». There was also this previous thread (look #4)

    "Toodle-oo" would date as far back as World War 1, even before. The Online Etymology Dictionary dates it from 1907, and gives a variant "tooraloo" (1921), more similar to the Quebec version.:)
    I'm sure some of the forer@s have heard this Irish lullaby

    I've yet to see conclusive proof, but the theory that it is a jocular distortion of the French à toute à l'heure seems to me be the most likely origin, given that WW1, in throwing into sudden proximity ordinary Britons /Australians /etc. who spoke no French and ordinary Frenchmen /Belgians /etc. who spoke no English threw up so many similar phrases. "San Fairy Ann" -- ça ne fait rien (= it doesn't matter) is another such I remember hearing from older people in my youth.
    Sorry, I think it would be against WR rules to give the link to this
     

    DaveA56

    New Member
    English - American
    I like this one:
    The Loop is a very famous area in the City of Chicago and there is an old story about the man who gets on the bus and asks the bus driver, "Does this bus go through the Loop? To which the driver replies, "No, but it does go beep, beep!"

    This joke works even better when the Chicago man says (as he would have) "Does this bus go to da Loop?"
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I agree with Gil 's theory No. 2 to the effect that toodle-oo/tootle-oo comes from the French à tout à l'heure, i.e. see you soon/back in a jiffy. (It was thought in 1914, as is usually the case, that the war would be over by Christmas). The word occurs in a song popular with the troops in WW l written by the British music-hall songwriters R.P. Weston and Bert Lee, who later wrote the ghost-tale ditty, "With 'er 'ead tooked oonderneath 'er arm" often sung by Stanley Holloway:
    http://www.gugalyrics.com/GOOD-BYEE-LYRICS/406195/

    It will be noted that the idiom of the lyics is the kind of language the public school-educated officers would have used, though squaddies also laced their speech with scraps of French, slightly more mangled, like plonk (still in use, for cheap wine) from vin blanc via the corruption blink blonk.

    I have heard the theory about the Loop before, but it seems apocryphal to me, as is also the theory of the man buying tickets for himself and his wife to an English station: "Two to Lewes, please".
     
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