Top of the class

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Hotmale

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,
Can I drop "at the" in the sentence:

"Martha performed (at the) top of the class."

Thank you
 
  • KHS

    Senior Member
    Hello,
    Can I drop "at the" in the sentence:

    "Martha performed (at the) top of the class."
    I don't think so, because top of the class is not a task or function that Martha has performed. Rather, in a sense, it is the *location* where she performed - among the students who are "located" at the top of the class.

    Karen
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Is Hotmale's use of "the top of the class" common?
    (It must be for tabac and KHS :))

    Martha was top of the class, - yes.
    Martha was at the top of the class, - yes.
    Go to the top of the class, but leave your books, you'll soon be back, - yes.
    Martha performed at the top of the class - ?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Is Hotmale's use of "the top of the class" common?
    (It must be for tabac and KHS :))

    Martha was top of the class, - yes.:tick:
    Martha was at the top of the class, - yes.:tick:
    Go to the top of the class, but leave your books, you'll soon be back, - yes.:tick:
    Martha performed at the top of the class - ?:confused:
    I agree with panj.

    Loob
     

    tinlizzy

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    AE: Top meaning highest not front.

    Martha performed at the top of the class. Meaning one of the smartest, best students.

    If you drop the (at the) then I think the sentence should become, "Martha performed top of her class".
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    In my dialect of American English, I would not say
    -------------
    Go to the top of the class, but leave your books, you'll soon be back.
    -------------
    If I have understood the meaning here correctly, I would say, "Go to the front of the class..."

    The other point (whether it is possible to omit "of the"):

    After I read tabac's comment that "She's top of the class" (meaning an excellent student) could be used in conversational English, I realized that it didn't sound so bad to me, though I probably wouldn't omit "of the" myself.

    Karen
     
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