tortilla de patatas poco cuajada

iribela

Senior Member
USA
Spanish - Uruguay
The trouble is that "over easy" is already taken as a term to describe the runny texture of the yolk of fried eggs.


Another possibility is an omelet just set, as mentioned in the quote above. @iribela, now do you pass? ;)
Will egg be running down my chin? 😆
At the end of the day, as helpful as a description such as “poco cuajada” can be on a menu, if I see something I’m not sure about, I’ll ask. And we’re talking about eggs here.
Beside over-easy, you can ask for your eggs sunny side up. The yolk will be nice and runny too. And while this won’t work for Spanish tortilla, it shows the range of descriptions to be familiar with when dealing with eggs!
 
  • I see, thank you, Mr D :)
    omelette baveuse nf(omelette bien fouettée) (UK)fluffy omelette n
    (US)fluffy omelet n
    This coincides with @JudithAWJ's suggestion. A fluffy omelet is one with a lot of air whipped into it in the process of scrambling. The addition of a small amount of water or milk helps that along. But the eggs for Spanish tortillas are barely scrambled, and no fluid is added to them. In my experience, the result is never airy. If not creamy, it's dense, sometimes rubbery 😝
     

    Mister Draken

    Senior Member
    Castellano (Argentina)
    1) Fluffy and also 2) runny. Maybe there is some inconsistency in the dictionary.

    baveux adj(encore souple) (cookery)runny adj
    Les meilleurs omelettes sont celles baveuses.
    The best omelettes are runny ones.
     
    Last edited:

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    1) Fluffy and also 2) runny. Maybe there is some inconsistency in the dictionary.

    baveux adj(encore souple) (cookery)runny adj
    Les meilleurs omelettes sont celles baveuses.
    The best omelettes are runny ones.
    Undoubtedly referring to a French omelette, which is quite different in texture from a Spanish omelette, which is the topic of this thread.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "Easy" = "promiscuous".

    "Moist" = "not dried out"
    Are you reading my posts?

    For the third time now, “over easy” is an established, neutral culinary term in the US. No US English speaker associates the phrase with the “promiscuous” meaning.

    Your word, on the other hand, is a horrible one that many people hate. It’s ironic that you are criticizing “over easy” for sounding unappetizing while suggesting one of the most revolting-sounding words ever.

    why hate word moist - Google Search

    The trouble is that "over easy" is already taken as a term to describe the runny texture of the yolk of fried eggs.
    Isn’t it also the yolk that’s runny in this case?
     

    SuperScuffer

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    I’ve never heard “soft-set,” personally. Is it familiar to British speakers?
    Its a descriptive and certainly more understandable than "over-easy" which is meaningless in British English. As "soft-set" was proposed by a US English speaker it would seem to be understandable to a US English speaker also. The original question was posed by a member of the forum based in Spain - so if they were looking for a translation to go on their menu in Spain, its pointless using a term that only Americans would understand, hence soft-set, or some of the other suggestions such as "soft and runny" would be the best options.

    I actually think I would probably write it with a description in brackets, eg:-

    "Spanish Omelette 'poco cuajada' (soft potato omelette)"
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    it would seem to be understandable to a US English speaker also.
    As I said, I wasn't familiar with it, and I don't think it would be understood by all US English speakers.

    if they were looking for a translation to go on their menu in Spain, its pointless using a term that only Americans would understand, hence soft-set, or some of the other suggestions such as "soft and runny" would be the best options.
    I agree that we need to take the target audience into account, and if this is intended for an international audience, then a US-only term should not be used. Nevertheless, as I said above, I have my doubts about how universally understood "soft-set" would be. I definitely wouldn't use "soft and runny," for palatability reasons:
    “Runny” no suena nada apetecible en inglés.

    I actually think I would probably write it with a description in brackets, eg:-

    "Spanish Omelette 'poco cuajada' (soft potato omelette)"
    Whether or not any or all of the original Spanish is maintained, we definitely need a description in English. I don't think "soft" is specific enough.

    Maybe "lightly cooked"? 🤔
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    "lightly cooked"?
    Sí. Yo lo entendería igual.
    Poco cuajada=poco hecha

    Asumiendo que se refiere al interior de la tortilla, la parte que no está en contacto con la sartén, ya que en esta última sí estará cuajado el huevo.
    Si no es así la tortilla se desmorona y más que una tortilla parecería que te sirven lo que alguien devolvió (expulsó por la boca tras comerlo).


    Pero, repito, ese añadido, poco cuajada, es inusual verlo en una carta.
    ¿Qué pasa si al comensal le gusta la tortilla bien hecha, es decir, que el huevo esté bien cuajado?
    ¿No es capaz el cocinero de hacerla así?
    Si no es capaz tendría que cambiar de trabajo.

    Lo normal es presentarla sin más como "Tortilla española". Sin más. Si ese local considera que "es mejor tortilla" una que esté jugosa y, por lo tanto, poco cuajada, y entonces tienen por costumbre servirla así, poco hecha, pues que lo hagan.
    Pero si una vez la tiene en el plato el cliente y a él no le gusta tan poco hecha, pedirá que se la hagan/cocinen más. Y el cocinero tendrá que darle una solución.

    Puede ser que lo anotaran en la carta de ese modo para que el cliente, desde el primer momento, sepa cómo la sirven de forma general en ese local. Y así, si a ti te gusta muy cuajada, se lo indiques al camarero. De este modo no hay sorpresas, ni para el cliente ni para el cocinero.
     

    horsewishr

    Senior Member
    English (Generic Midwest Variety)
    I just wanted to add a clarification of “over easy.”

    The term means that the egg is cooked on one side and then flipped over and briefly cooked on the other side. If this is how a soft-set tortilla is prepared, over easy is a good translation. But if it’s prepared some other way, over easy doesn’t work.

    Personally, I think soft-set is the best suggestion.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Well, since "over easy" is not used in all varieties of English*, it shouldn't be used regardless if the audience includes readers who don't know the term.

    *It seems to be specific to US English, or at least North American English (I don't know if it's used in Canada).
     

    JudithAWJ

    New Member
    English (British)
    Well, since "over easy" is not used in all varieties of English*, it shouldn't be used regardless if the audience includes readers who don't know the term.

    *It seems to be specific to US English, or at least North American English (I don't know if it's used in Canada).
    Haha, eight years later and still tossing this term back and forth. Sorry, but to British ears 'over easy' just doesn't work. 'Moist' and 'juicy' also spring to my mind, but I'm still happy with 'fluffy' as a reasonably accurate way to describe these delicious omelettes.🙂
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    and briefly cooked on the other side
    No. La tortilla se hace/cocina normalmente el mismo tiempo por ambos lados.
    La única diferencia de tiempo entre ambas caras podría ser que la que inicialmente queda encima (la que ve el cocinero mientras hace la primera cara) cuando se le da la vuelta y se cocina esa cara, probablemente no necesita tanto tiempo como la primera, sobre todo si quieres obtener una tortilla jugosa/cremosa o poco hecha/cuajada.
    ¿Por qué? Porque mientras se hizo la primera cara algo de calor llega y "cocina" de algún modo la parte superior - pierde una cierta cantidad de agua el huevo- y eso hace que ya no necesite tanto tiempo para hacerse la segunda cara como la primera.
    Pero en todo esto hay varios factores que intervienen, uno de ellos a destacar sería el grosor de la tortilla.

    Evidentemente cada cocinero tiene sus propios métodos.

    Lo que explicas se hace con los huevos, y te cito, es por hacerlos a la plancha y para conseguir que toda la clara se cocine.
    Sucede que si al echar el huevo este queda compacto y no se extiende mucho, al tener mayor grosor así, se necesitaría más tiempo de cocinado por ese primer lado para que se cocine la clara que queda en la parte superior. Pero si se hace eso, más tiempo cocinándose por el primer lado, podrías quemar ese lado o dejarlo demasiado seco/tostado. Es por esto que se le da la vuelta y se cocina por la segunda cara apenas unos segundos.

    Esto en las casas españolas no se suele hacer así. Me explico, en España los huevos fritos se echan en abundante aceite, como un dedo - su grosor- o así de aceite, y mientras cocinas el lado inferior vas echando el aceite caliente de la sartén sobre el lado superior.
    No hay ninguna vuelta. Se hace todo de una vez. En cuanto alcanzas el punto deseado, lo sacas... y te lo comes. :)
     

    franzjekill

    Mod E/S
    Español rioplatense
    Para mí, esas frases implican un defecto, algo mal hecho.
    A mis oídos, "poco cuajada" no resulta precisamente atractivo tampoco. Me suena a defecto. La "perfección", aunque es subjetiva, se alcanza en un punto intermedio, y ese "poco" me da la idea de que le faltó cocción. "Cremosa", aunque menos preciso, suena más apetitoso y es como acostumbro llamarla.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Totalmente de acuerdo con jilar.
    Y tampoco creo que una tortilla de patatas sea fluffy. 'Moist', 'runny' y 'juicy' sinceramente suenan poco atractivos.
    La mejor opción para mi es 'lightly cooked'.
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Estoy de acuerdo con quienes han dicho que 'poco cuajada' no es una expresión que te invite a comer algo. Hablando de cocina, set es el témino que se emplea para indicar que una sustancia líquida, como el huevo, se ha solidificado. Entiendo que se refiere a que ha alcanzado su punto de cocción óptimo. Si al preparar esta tortilla (poco cuajada) se detiene la cocción antes de que el huevo esté set (punto sólido), la tortilla estaría, tal vez, lightly set.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I’ve never heard the word “set” used to refer to eggs. As correct as it may be, this is a menu and we need to use terminology that average diners will understand. There are tons of culinary terms that don’t mean anything to everyday people. If I saw an egg dish described on a menu as “soft-set” or “lightly set,” I’d have no idea what that meant. “lightly cooked,” on the other hand, is clear to anyone.

    (Fun fact: “set” is the English word with the most definitions. :p)
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    I’ve never heard the word “set” used to refer to eggs. As correct as it may be, this is a menu and we need to use terminology that average diners will understand. There are tons of culinary terms that don’t mean anything to everyday people. If I saw an egg dish described on a menu as “soft-set” or “lightly set,” I’d have no idea what that meant. “lightly cooked,” on the other hand, is clear to anyone.
    Really? I'm sure if you look up recipes containing eggs, even a Spanish tortilla, you'll probably see a reference to the degree of doneness as "set." On the other hand, "poco cuajada" leaves me wondering if the eggs might be too raw to be safe to eat. And yes, most people are not familiar with a lot of culinary terms, but that doesn't stop restaurants from using them in their descriptions. As far as "lightly cooked," it's not that different from "lightly set" considering that when an egg is set, it's cooked. Just a matter of preference in terminology.
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Right! I think “cooked” is far more likely to be understood by your average diner.
    It is an easier to understand word, yes.
    And just out of curiosity, I looked up recipes in English and found this: The dramatic climax of tortilla making comes when the eggs have mostly set and the tortilla is ready to be flipped.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    It’s clear there, but as a menu item with no further context, “Spanish omelette, lightly set” would not be clear to me.
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    y ese "poco" me da la idea de que le faltó cocción.
    Ese "poco" sirve, en este caso, para formar el antónimo de "cuajada".
    Ya que los huevos o están en estado líquido(podríamos asociarlo a crudo completamente)/semilíquido (asociado a ligeramente cocinado sin llegar a solidificar), o bien completamente sólidos. Es decir, o cuajaron o no cuajaron.
    Y cuajada sin más equivale a que el huevo estará sólido.

    Si un filete te gusta "poco hecho" así lo pedirás en contra de que a otro le guste "muy hecho". Ambos están "hechos" (cocinados), pero el primero está menos hecho que el segundo.
    Un perro lo come crudo sin queja alguna. ;)

    En el huevo no tiene sentido decir "muy hecho/cuajado", porque en el mismo momento que cuaje ya tiene ese estado, no por hacerlo cuajará más... en ese caso ya se empezaría a hablar de secarlo o quemarlo.



    Estoy de acuerdo con quienes han dicho que 'poco cuajada' no es una expresión que te invite a comer algo.
    Los gustos de cada cual son subjetivos y no deberían influir a la hora de nombrar un plato.
    Yo prefiero un filete "poco hecho" a otro "muy hecho" (uno así me parece comer un trozo de cuero :) ). Otros pueden tener otras preferencias, así que el atractivo de un nombre depende de los gustos de cada uno.
    Las ostras crudas que para muchos son una delicia, yo ni las puedo ver.
    Y en un restaurante no te ponen en la carta "ostras crudas" aunque así las sirvan. A esos que les gustan las ostras crudas no creo yo que esa forma de presentarlas les pareciese poco atractiva.
    ¿O acaso el hecho de que aparezca esa palabra, crudas, les llevaría a no comerlas aunque les gusten así?

    lightly set.
    Sí, esa es la idea que sugiere "poco cuajada". O como dijo elroy, usando "cooked".

    En resumidas cuentas, al leer ese nombre el comensal sabe que la tortilla vendrá con su interior poco hecho. El huevo (yema y clara batidas -mezcladas) no estará completamente cuajado y tendrá una textura cremosa (semilíquida).

    ¡Que aproveche! :D
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    It’s clear there, but as a menu item with no further context, “Spanish omelette, lightly set” would not be clear to me.
    Just providing one example of how it is used in this context. I understand it would not be clear to you, so you'd likely have to ask, as people often do when reading a menu, about the particulars of the dish. I know if I saw "lightly cooked" I would feel like asking "So, how close to uncooked are the eggs in this tortilla?" One thing that might definitely be done: this thread. :D
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I know if I saw "lightly cooked" I would feel like asking "So, how close to uncooked are the eggs in this tortilla?"
    Would you not feel the need to ask that if it said "lightly set"?
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Would you not feel the need to ask that if it said "lightly set"?
    That's a good point, though we've determined that I'm familiar with set, as a culinary term. I'd probably assume the eggs are a bit 'runny,' as has been mentioned here. I guess we go back to preference or experience? But one could also focus on the fact that here "cuajada" refers specifically to the eggs, same as "set" in English. On the other hand, "cooked" can also refer to the doneness of the potatoes or other solid ingredients in the tortilla.
     

    Hulalessar

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Are you reading my posts?

    For the third time now, “over easy” is an established, neutral culinary term in the US. No US English speaker associates the phrase with the “promiscuous” meaning.

    Your word, on the other hand, is a horrible one that many people hate. It’s ironic that you are criticizing “over easy” for sounding unappetizing while suggesting one of the most revolting-sounding words ever.

    why hate word moist - Google Search
    I did indeed read your posts.

    I have never queried the meaning of "over easy", nor have I suggested that anyone in the US associates the phrase with promiscuity. All I said was that "easy" can mean "promiscuous" and that to me (and I am not saying to anyone else) "over easy" has a double meaning. It could be a cultural thing as the English (I do not presume to speak for the Scottish, Irish or Welsh) like a double entendre.

    On the other hand it is news to me that the word "moist" has acquired unpleasant associations for some. There are lots of English words to indicate the degree of wetness, some of which, such as "dank", definitely imply an associated unpleasantness. As far as I am concerned "moist" can suggest that what is being talked about is not dry and has just the degree of wetness the situation requires. I do of course accept that words are slippery customers and acquire new meanings.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Indeed, it’s fascinating how words can be perceived so differently by different people! I think it’s important to avoid using any unpalatable words (no pun intended) on a menu, which is part of why this thread has gotten so long.

    Hmmmm… what about spongy?
     

    SuperScuffer

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    I think it’s important to avoid using any unpalatable words (no pun intended) on a menu, which is part of why this thread has gotten so long.
    It's interesting that several native Spanish speakers have said that “poco cuajada” doesn't sound very attractive to them, so perhaps the English version doesn't need to be very attractive either. After all, it's important that the customer knows exactly what they are ordering, even if it could put some people off.

    For example, I wouldn't find "raw horse meat" particularly attractive on a menu, but I'd rather know what it was before ordering steak tartare.

    Similarly if this particular Spanish Omelette is served undercooked or runny, perhaps it's best to tell the customer in advance, rather than have them complain about it afterwards, even if it does put people off from ordering it.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Another idea: “not firm”

    Like the Spanish, that defines it by what it’s not.
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    Similarly if this particular Spanish Omelette is served undercooked or runny, perhaps it's best to tell the customer in advance, rather than have them complain about it afterwards, even if it does put people off from ordering it.
    Como expliqué en algún mensaje anterior.

    Yo es la única explicación que veo para que aparezca ese "poco cuajada" en la carta.
    Evidentemente, mi hermano, por ejemplo, que no le gusta de ese modo, si le apeteciera tomar tortilla, al momento de pedirla le indicaría al camarero que él la toma/pide si se la cocinan más y que venga cuajada. Si no, pues no la pide y pedirá otra cosa.
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    It's interesting that several native Spanish speakers have said that “poco cuajada” doesn't sound very attractive to them...
    More than not sounding very attractive, I wondered why "poco cuajada" would need to be added in reference to a dish that, I'd like to believe, is made when a customer orders it, as opposed to the restaurant having tortillas de patatas poco cuajadas premade and ready to heat up and serve. With that in mind, if I were the chef or restaurant owner there, I would list Spanish Potato Omelette, made to order, and let the customer inquire about or ask for the desired degree of doneness, same as when you order steak (rare, medium, etc.), eggs over easy or sunny-side up, and other dishes you want served to your liking. It shouldn't be a big deal for the chef to let the tortilla cook a little longer for the eggs to set completely. If anything, when someone orders the tortilla and doesn't think to ask, the waiter can provide more details, as they often do.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    You're right, but our task here is to translate "poco cuajada," whether or not it makes sense for it to be on the menu. :D

    What do you think of my latest suggestions ("spongy" and "not firm")?
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    You're right, but our task here is to translate "poco cuajada," whether or not it makes sense for it to be on the menu. :D

    What do you think of my latest suggestions ("spongy" and "not firm")?
    Of course, translation was the task. I was responding specifically to the description not sounding very attractive.
    To answer your question, I think "spongy" doesn't tell me the eggs will be runny, just very light, whipped. Now, if the listing included "not firm," I would understand it to mean that the eggs won't be fully cooked. It would work for me. I don't know whether that's a description you're likely to see in a menu, but then again, I never expected to see "poco cuajada" in a menu either!

    These are a few explanations from online recipes that refer to firmness (underlined by me):

    - When the eggs start to firm up, place a plate over the pan and flip...

    - A perfect tortilla has a firm outer layer that, when sliced, oozes ever so slightly out of shape (as opposed to releasing a bunch of uncooked egg or, worse, being a firm, cakelike lump).

    - ...gently slide it back into the pan so the uncooked side can firm up.
     

    Hulalessar

    Senior Member
    English - England
    More than not sounding very attractive, I wondered why "poco cuajada" would need to be added in reference to a dish that, I'd like to believe, is made when a customer orders it, as opposed to the restaurant having tortillas de patatas poco cuajadas premade and ready to heat up and serve.
    I would expect a French omelette to be made to order, but not a Spanish one. You cannot knock one up in five minutes and a normal sized whole one is far too much for a person with a normal appetite. I do not what what you do in Uruguay, but here in Spain a tortilla española is often displayed on the counter with other tapas and a slice is cut off when someone wants one. See here: Surtido De Pinchos Y De Tapas En La Exhibición Del Restaurante Tortilla De Las Patatas, Montaditos Imagen de archivo - Imagen de carne, coma: 141861067
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    I would expect a French omelette to be made to order, but not a Spanish one. You cannot knock one up in five minutes and a normal sized whole one is far too much for a person with a normal appetite. I do not what what you do in Uruguay, but here in Spain a tortilla española is often displayed on the counter with other tapas and a slice is cut off when someone wants one. See here: Surtido De Pinchos Y De Tapas En La Exhibición Del Restaurante Tortilla De Las Patatas, Montaditos Imagen de archivo - Imagen de carne, coma: 141861067
    I can't speak for everybody and everywhere in Uruguay, but I certainly have seen this type of tortilla displayed as your picture shows, as well as many other already made food items like pascualina, torta de jamón y queso, milanesas, etc. etc. However, I would not expect the eggs inside a tortilla sitting on a counter to be runny as described in this thread. Also, what happens to the eggs when you heat up the tortilla? Or do you eat it cold? Speaking of a restaurant stating on their menu that the eggs in their tortilla are poco cuajados, I would definitely expect that they cook the tortilla to order. The tortilla doesn't have to be family-sized.
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    What do you think of my latest suggestions ("spongy" and "not firm")
    El problema con esponjosa es que podrías hacerla así, esponjosa, pero con el huevo completamente cuajado. Por lo tanto, no sería "poco cuajada".

    Esponjoso quiere decir que está aireada o que hay burbujas de aire. Término usual en masas. Puedes hacer un pan esponjoso, una magdalena, o cualquier otro tipo de masa. O los famosos "pancakes" que llevan harina y huevos, entre otros ingredientes.
    Pero siempre tendrás el huevo cuajado en este tipo de productos porque si no es así la masa estará cruda. Y eso no lo quiere/busca ningún cocinero.

    "Firm", creo que podría traducirse como "mazacote". Aquí el ejemplo que da Google en su definición:
    Pasta o masa, generalmente alimenticia, espesa, pegajosa y apelmazada.
    "pidió una tortilla y le sirvieron un mazacote de huevo".

    De ese ejemplo se desprende que le sirvieron una tortilla (francesa) como cualquiera la puede hacer, esto es, completamente seca, el huevo todo cuajado. Como indiqué antes, esa forma de prepararla no es el ideal de ningún cocinero. Los cocineros son enseñados para hacer una tortilla en la que su interior el huevo esté medio cocinado, poco cuajado o semilíquido. Lo que buscan es ese aporte de jugosidad que no tendría si el huevo cuaja del todo.

    En una tortilla no hay harina y es difícil hablar de masa, pero se podría hacer más o menos esponjosa (por ejemplo añadiendo agua carbonatada o con gas - solo para obtener esa esponjosidad porque no es algo típico de su receta) o según cuánto batas los huevos (cuanto más batidos habrá más aire en ese revuelto).

    Pero todo esto no quiere decir que la tortilla salga "poco cuajada".
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    A ver si con esto último queda más claro.

    Veo que el diccionario ofrece tres verbos en inglés para cuajar.
    cuajar vtr(líquido: volver espeso) (milk)curdle vtr
    (blood)coagulate vtr
    (jelly)set vtr

    Supongo que el más lógico, o que puede dar más sentido, cuando hablamos de huevos será SET. Y ningún nativo ha mencionado los otros dos.

    Y me viene muy bien comparar la mermelada (jelly) con la gelatina (jelly igualmente).

    Bien, la gelatina tiene la textura del huevo cuajado, podríamos decir. Son sólidos aunque tienen cierta flexibilidad.

    Y la mermelada es comparable con la textura de un huevo batido y "poco cuajado". La mermelada no está sólida (a menos que la cocines demasiado y hagas que la fruta pierda todasu agua... se hablaría más de confitura o la textura de un membrillo - muy similar a la gelatina).

    La mermelada gotea, igual que una tortilla con su interior "poco cuajada". El exterior de la tortilla no, no gotea, como tampoco la gelatina.

    A ver si ahora.

    Yo diría "lightly set/cooked". :)
     

    Nomenclature

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    “Runny” no suena nada apetecible en inglés.
    👍🏻 Y se ve que el concepto no es tan fácil de traducir con un solo adjetivo: French to English - omelette baveuse.
    Different opinion here. To some people, sure. But I think most people would see it and—if they don't like runny eggs—think "Oh, I like my eggs more cooked. Better avoid that."

    I don't know about disgust. I think only a few people would truly be disgusted by it. But to me, it sounds good. I like my eggs runny. (A funny expression I've heard recently: I don't 'yuck' other people's 'yum'.") 🙂

    I do think "creamy" is the best translation for a Spanish omelette on a restaurant menu. "Creamy" is commonly used with scrambled eggs in the same sense, so it would be understood and sounds good imo.

    If we didn't have to worry about being palatable for a restaurant menu, I would refer to it as the eggs' runnyness.
     

    Nomenclature

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    A ver si con esto último queda más claro.

    Veo que el diccionario ofrece tres verbos en inglés para cuajar.
    cuajar vtr(líquido: volver espeso) (milk)curdle vtr
    (blood)coagulate vtr
    (jelly)set vtr

    Supongo que el más lógico, o que puede dar más sentido, cuando hablamos de huevos será SET. Y ningún nativo ha mencionado los otros dos.

    Y me viene muy bien comparar la mermelada (jelly) con la gelatina (jelly igualmente).

    Bien, la gelatina tiene la textura del huevo cuajado, podríamos decir. Son sólidos aunque tienen cierta flexibilidad.

    Y la mermelada es comparable con la textura de un huevo batido y "poco cuajado". La mermelada no está sólida (a menos que la cocines demasiado y hagas que la fruta pierda todasu agua... se hablaría más de confitura o la textura de un membrillo - muy similar a la gelatina).

    La mermelada gotea, igual que una tortilla con su interior "poco cuajada". El exterior de la tortilla no, no gotea, como tampoco la gelatina.

    A ver si ahora.

    Yo diría "lightly set/cooked". :)
    I think it would be something like

    Líquido = runny
    Mermelada = runny/jammy/creamy
    Gelatina = jammy
    Mazacote = fully set (neutral sentiment)/rubbery(negative sentiment)
     

    jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    Que pongan una foto de cómo presentan la tortilla. Y les vale para cualquier idioma.
    Tendrán que pensar una solución para los ciegos. ¿Ofrecerles una muestra que puedan tocar?
    :D

    I do think "creamy" is the best translation for a Spanish omelette on a restaurant menu.
    A mí también me convence.
    Al fin y al cabo muestra la textura que tiene la tortilla en su interior, está cremosa.

    Otro ejemplo donde el huevo no debe cuajar es en la salsa carbonara original. O en la salsa holandesa.
    Si cuajara no estaríamos ante una salsa, a menos que aceptemos que una salsa pueda llevar trocitos sólidos. Si cuajara en una de estas dos recetas notaríamos al comerla que la salsa tiene trocitos sólidos, como si fuera una especie de cuscús o así.
     
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