Torvill and Dean vs Dean and Torvill [man's or woman's name first?]

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Packard

Senior Member
USA, English
Each year, on February 14th (Valentines Day), I give out tiny boxes of candy hearts with small slogans on them to the women who work with me and some of the women who regularly wait on me in restaurants and coffee houses. The hearts look like this: http://multimedia.heraldinteractive.com/images/20100119/f6207a_text.jpg
and the small boxes cost about $0.25 each. It makes most of the recipients smile.

Last year one woman declined my token gift because, "I'm a Jehovah's Witness, and we do not observe pagan rituals." (Which seemed a bit harsh over a 25¢ package of candy).

This year, to circumvent the issue I made a card to accompany the candy. It says:

On February 14th, 1984 Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean skated as dance pairs to the music of Ravel’s Bolero in the Olympics at Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. When it was announced that they had won the gold medal Christopher Dean stood and and with both arms he traced a large heart in the air and said, “I love you” to Jayne Torvill.
Millions of lip-reading TV watchers were deeply affected by this show of emotion and from that came the tradition of handing out candies with sentimental notions imprinted on them each year on this date.

The first sentence is true. The rest is a fabrication.

This is a big, long story and pretty superfluous to the question which is: Torvill and Dean was a dance skating pair. They were always referred to as "Torvill and Dean"; never "Dean and Torvill". In most situations where there is a male/female pairing the man's name is first, the woman's follows. Is this as quirk of dance skating? Is this a UK thing? or am I under the delusion that the man's name typically comes first?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    :D:D:D I thought of Sonny and Cher, Peter, Paul and Mary, so it's in the US as well, whatever it is. However, I suspect a marketing man (or woman) has decided that the cadence is better one way round. Mammas and Poppas and (if you go back that far) Nina and Frederick.
     

    frenchifried

    Senior Member
    English - UK/US
    It is probably just the way they are known without any hidden agenda (or agender;)). It could also be a question of euphonics. Torvill and Dean sounds better than Dean and Torvill.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    Each year, on February 14th (Valentines Day), I give out tiny boxes of candy hearts with small slogans on them to the women who work with me and some of the women who regularly wait on me in restaurants and coffee houses. The hearts look like this: http://multimedia.heraldinteractive.com/images/20100119/f6207a_text.jpg
    and the small boxes cost about $0.25 each. It makes most of the recipients smile.

    Last year one woman declined my token gift because, "I'm a Jehovah's Witness, and we do not observe pagan rituals." (Which seemed a bit harsh over a 25¢ package of candy).

    This year, to circumvent the issue I made a card to accompany the candy. It says:

    On February 14th, 1984 Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean skated as dance pairs to the music of Ravel’s Bolero in the Olympics at Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. When it was announced that they had won the gold medal Christopher Dean stood and and with both arms he traced a large heart in the air and said, “I love you” to Jayne Torvill.
    Millions of lip-reading TV watchers were deeply affected by this show of emotion and from that came the tradition of handing out candies with sentimental notions imprinted on them each year on this date.

    The first sentence is true. The rest is a fabrication.

    This is a big, long story and pretty superfluous to the question which is: Torvill and Dean was a dance skating pair. They were always referred to as "Torvill and Dean"; never "Dean and Torvill". In most situations where there is a male/female pairing the man's name is first, the woman's follows. Is this as quirk of dance skating? Is this a UK thing? or am I under the delusion that the man's name typically comes first?


    I can only tell you, that in Russian the names always were "Female-Male".

    Rodnina-Ulanov, Rodnina-Zaitsev, Linnichuk-Karpopnosov, Pakhomova-Gorshkov.

    Might as well follow the tradition.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The sport is called "ice dancing". The woman's name is almost always first in pairs skating.
    Thank you for the correction.

    And thanks to everyone for the replies.

    I guess it is "Hillary and Bill Clinton" now, although whenever I see "Clinton" in the newspapers I initially think of President Bill Clinton and not the Secretary of State.

    Regards,


    Packard
     
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