total surrender to a scientific problem

< Previous | Next >

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
This kind of acceptance of one's own nature instead of living up to some external ideal is characteristic of the more mature male who is so sure of himself that he doesn't have to bother proving anything. Openness to experience is characteristic. So also is postambivalence, i.e., being able to love wholly, without tinctures of hostility or fear or the necessity of control. To get a little closer to our topic I would also use the word for being able to give oneself over completely to an emotion, not only of love but also of anger, fascination, or total surrender to a scientific problem.
(The Psychology of Science; Abraham H. Maslow)

Would you be so kind as to tell me whether it should be read as follows: "...for being able to give oneself over completely to total surrender to a scientific problem"?

Thanks.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    This should be read in two parts: "(to give oneself over completely to an emotion, not only of love but also of anger, fascination) or (total surrender to a scientific problem)." "Giving oneself over completely" and "surrender" convey the same idea. Applying both of them to the same concept, here a scientific problem, would be redundant.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    This should be read in two parts: "(to give oneself over completely to an emotion, not only of love but also of anger, fascination) or (total surrender to a scientific problem)."
    But then a problem arises:
    being able to:
    - give oneself over completely to an emotion, not only of love but also of anger, fascination, or:tick:
    - total surrender to a scientific problem.:confused:
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    As I read it, "total surrender to a scientific problem" is one of these "emotions":

    being able to give oneself over completely to an emotion,
    not only of (1) love but also of (2) anger, (3) fascination, or (4) total surrender to a scientific problem.

    The four items are given in the form of a list of "emotions" (with no indication that "fascination is the last in the list), so I don't think it's legitimate to count "surrender to a scientific problem" as a separate and unconnected item in this way:

    being able to give oneself over completely to an emotion, not only of love but also of anger, fascination,
    or total surrender to a scientific problem.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top