touches a little bit of grief and a little bit of romance

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
A YouTube video called "My Book Clubs Picks". A woman represents a book:
-- And this story is again, another thriller with twists and turns and everything that's amazing about a thriller novel. Again this touches a little bit of grief and a little bit of romance with big twists and turns and I don't really want to give too much away but, I really loved this book, it was great.

I think the object of "touch" here is the whole phrase "a little bit of grief and a little bit of romance", and the verb has this meaning:
TOUCH
to deal with a particular subject, situation etc
I wouldn’t touch such a difficult piece of work.
Is that correct? Thank you.
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think you need the preposition "on".

    A book touches on a subject.

    Again this [book] touches on a little bit of grief and a little bit of romance with big twists and turns and I don't really want to give too much away but, I really loved this book, it was great.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I think you need the preposition "on".

    A book touches on a subject.

    Again this [book] touches on a little bit of grief and a little bit of romance with big twists and turns and I don't really want to give too much away but, I really loved this book, it was great.
    Actually, I clearly hear her saying "touches a little bit on grief, and a little bit of romance", though in her transcript it's "of grief". But she does say "of romance".

    So maybe she did intend to say "touches on grief/romance", an use "a little bit" as an adverbial?...
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Actually, I clearly hear her saying "touches a little bit on grief, and a little bit of romance", though in her transcript it's "of grief". But she does say "of romance".

    So maybe she did intend to say "touches on grief/romance", an use "a little bit" as an adverbial?...
    I would say it is the shortened form of "touch on the subject of".

    So I think the "on" needs to be in place somewhere in the sentence. If you wrote it out and deleted part you will see what I mean.

    Again this touches a little bit of on [the subject of] grief and a little bit [on the subject] of romance with big twists and turns...

    I would have gone for a parallel construction using "on" in both instances:

    Again this touches a little bit of on [the subject of] grief and a little bit on [the subject of] romance with big twists and turns...
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I would say it is the shortened form of "touch on the subject of".

    So I think the "on" needs to be in place somewhere in the sentence. If you wrote it out and deleted part you will see what I mean.

    Again this touches a little bit of on [the subject of] grief and a little bit [on the subject] of romance with big twists and turns...

    I would have gone for a parallel construction using "on" in both instances:

    Again this touches a little bit of on [the subject of] grief and a little bit on [the subject of] romance with big twists and turns...
    My personal interpretation is that she uses "touches a little bit" as a kind of diminutive phrase. She wants to say that the book has parts with grieving, and parts with romance, but not too much of either. It just touches on those emotions. On the other hand, I read "touches on the subject of" as meaning that the book contains brief discussions about grief and romance. That could just be my interpretation, though! ;)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    My personal interpretation is that she uses "touches a little bit" as a kind of diminutive phrase. She wants to say that the book has parts with grieving, and parts with romance, but not too much of either. It just touches on those emotions. On the other hand, I read "touches on the subject of" as meaning that the book contains brief discussions about grief and romance. That could just be my interpretation, though! ;)
    I added the "understood" words to help explain the structure of the sentence. I think the "little bit" covers the depth of the discussion on the subject.
     
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