... tour sold out within hours of the band announcing it ...

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loviii

Senior Member
Russian
Good day!

lexico.com:
(1) The entire European tour sold out within hours of the band announcing it on their website.

I can understand:
(2) The entire European tour sold out within hours after the band announced it on their website.
If I'm not mistaken, we can also say, using the nominative absolute participial construction:
(3) The entire European tour sold out within hours, the band announcing it on their website.

a) But I cannot understand the grammar of (1).
By what principle is it made up?
How does the grammar construction used in (1) call?

b) If "the band announcing it on their website" in (1) is such an absolute construction as in (3), how can it have "of" before itself?

c) I cannot understand the function of the preposition "of" in (1). For example, "a leg of the table" says about the belonging of a leg to the table. But what role does "of" implement here?

d) Can you give some similar examples in terms of grammar where we also have preposition "of" before an absolute participle construction but without "within" in the sentence.

Thanks!
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The structure you have here is "within hours of x". X could equally well have been a noun: The tour sold out within hours of the announcement.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The entire European tour sold out within hours of the band announcing it on their website. :tick:
    The entire European tour sold out within hours after the band announced it on their website. :thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
    The entire European tour sold out within hours, the band announcing it on their website. :cross:

    Within means inside – in this context, inside a fixed period of time counting forward from a particular action or event. It’s not normal to say “within hours after something”. However, it does work if you rephrase it to:


    After the band announced it on their website, the European tour sold out within hours. :tick:
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The structure you have here is "within hours of x". X could equally well have been a noun: The tour sold out within hours of the announcement.
    :thumbsup:
    The dictionary uses length and distance as examples of the "within ... of ..." construction but it also works with time
    at or to some point not beyond, as in length or distance; not farther than: within a radius of a mile.
    at or to some amount or degree not exceeding: within two degrees of freezing.
     
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