Tout ça pour dire que ...

Sibylle64

Senior Member
France
Bonjour,

Comment pourrais-je dire en anglais, de manière informelle dans une discussion "Tout ça pour dire que ..." afin de conclure une discussion.

Thanks for your help !!
 
  • Sibylle64

    Senior Member
    France
    So is this ok ?
    "All that to say that, as soon as your potential is acknowledged, you will have to possibility to fulfill your career expectations". ?

    Thanks in advance !
     

    Albert 50

    Senior Member
    Canada: French and English (bilingual)
    When I've used the phrase "tout ça pour dire que" (at the close of a discussion) I mean, in English, "which basically means" or "in conclusion my basic point is..." or even "summing up".

    "In conclusion my basic point is: as soon as your potential is acknowledged you will be in a position to (be able to) fulfill your career expectations".

    Note: you can't say in English "you will have the possibilitiy to fulfil...". You have to say "it will be possible for you to" or a different construction like "you will be in a position to fulfil..." or even "able to" or "capable of".

    Cordialement
    Albert
     

    david314

    Senior Member
    American English
    When I've used the phrase "tout ça pour dire que" (at the close of a discussion) I mean, in English, "which basically means (that)" or "in conclusion my basic point is..." or even "summing up".
    This would be my choice, too. Please bear in mind that one cannot start a sentence with this phrase. :)
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Please bear in mind that one cannot start a sentence with this phrase. :)
    Agreed with you concerning formal written English, david. But let's not be too doctrinaire! In conversational, spoken (or even written--like an email) English, all the possibilities suggested are as common as sentence-starters in English as is the original French phrase.
     

    Juju333

    Banned
    French
    Full sentence:
    "It was such a bad experience going to this restaurant. Reception and service were terrible, food was disgusting, tables were very dirty... Well all that to say I'll never go to that place again!"
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    I think you need a sprinkling of 'the' as well ...

    "The reception, the service ... the food ... the tables ..."

    Also, "the reception" sounds a little French, I think. Do you not mean, "the welcome"?
     

    Juju333

    Banned
    French
    Really? I once read some reviews on the Internet wrote by English native speakers and one wrote "Reception was bad". Maybe I'm mistaken and that one was from a foreigner.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Response to your question,

    "Considering all that/All things considered, I'm never going back there!"
    [...]
     
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    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    No, I don't agree, broglet. When you are in the middle of an explanation that is getting complicated and overlong, it's not unusual (in AE) to stop the details and summarize the outcome with "Long story short, (we didn't go, we bought it, she said no, etc.)"
     
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    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    In other words, ... might be similar to the other expressions above, or may simply be a paraphrased explanation without necessarily being briefer.

    (Shorter words doesn't sound right--that would describe words of one-two syllables rather than longer words.)
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Depending on your audience, you might use the Shakespearean "In few, ...".

    But "In summary" (broglet's #14) or "To sum up" sounds like simply a condensation of the underlying argument, whereas (just my opinion) "All that to say" sounds like you're apologizing to your audience for having entered into so much detail.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    There is of course the hyper slangy version of listing all the disasters and then adding, "nuff sed" ( = That's enough said about that ...) at the end.

    I don't know if I should be encouraging foreign students to use this expression, though ;)
     
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