tout est bon dans le cochon

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cayteak

New Member
USA
USA (English)
Hi all.
I was browsing a French band's website and ran across the phrase "tout est bon dans le cochon, right?" Cochon in the dictionary means pig, but then the phrase doesn't make much sense.
Anyone have an idea what this phrase may mean?

Thanks so much!
 
  • Zhuli

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    I'm French and I'm not sure myself ! :p

    It's a saying we use when we mean everything is excellent, the job has been well done, there's no junk part.

    I really don't know the origin of it...
     

    Ariane

    New Member
    Belgium, French and Catalan
    It means there's no junk parts (of something), everything is valuable.
    I agree. When you kill a pig, every single part of it can be used. Nothing goes to waste. So this probably means that there is nothing bad, everything has some kind of value.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Hi all.
    I was browsing a French band's website and ran across the phrase "tout est bon dans le cochon, right?" Cochon in the dictionary means pig, but then the phrase doesn't make much sense.
    Anyone have an idea what this phrase may mean?

    Thanks so much!
    It reminds me of the sausage maker's saying, "we use everything but the oink!"

    but maybe it has a more figurative meaning...
     

    SwissMarie

    New Member
    Suisse; français
    It reminds me of the sausage maker's saying, "we use everything but the oink!"
    Yes, that's what "Dans le cochon tout est bon" means (that every single part can be used).
    I've never heard it used in a figurative way, though.
    It is a well-known phrase in French-speaking Switzerland, especially in the "Ajoie" (Porrentruy region; a rural area in the Jura mountains). There is a special celebration there at the "Saint-Martin" (11 November), where they traditionnally have a 12-dish meal with all the different pork dishes you can cook.

    […]

    Have a nice day! :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    tourne

    Senior Member
    france français
    the same expression exits in english (usa) with the buffalo. I heard it in the "making of" of a Pixar movie . the director said to the artists : "you must use everything of the buffalo", or something like that, about the layers, 3D files etc. (take that car,distort it, you have a new car).
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I've got another instance of this expression, and I'm not sure what to make of it. It's a customer's reply to the question
    what do you think of our service? He's talking about a bank. Thanks in advance for your thoughts...
     

    Michelvar

    Quasimodo
    French / France
    I think he wants to say that the bank uses every move he makes to get money from him. As if he was a pig, every part of him will be at the end engulfed by the bank.
     
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    ocilya

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Ou peut-être que le cochon est une métaphore pour la banque ? À cause des tirelires (piggy banks) ? Et donc, tous les services de la banque sont bons ?

    Ou peut-être que le symbole de la banque est un cochon... (disons que s'il avait parlé de "l'écureuil", par exemple, tout Français aurait su que c’était une métaphore pour une banque précise)
     

    pointvirgule

    Senior Member
    langue française
    Regarding Kelly's question, I tend to agree with Michelvar's interpretation. Read that way, the comment seems appropriately sarcastic.
    Once the mark is hooked, no part is wasted
    , pourrait-on dire...
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Thanks, all! Pointvirgule's is really clever. I'm thinking, though, along the lines of "let's take advantage of everything!" because it leaves more room for interpretation....?
     

    MichGuit

    New Member
    French
    Hi all.
    I was browsing a French band's website and ran across the phrase "tout est bon dans le cochon, right?" Cochon in the dictionary means pig, but then the phrase doesn't make much sense.
    Anyone have an idea what this phrase may mean?

    Thanks so much!
    In English, I would tell "every part is the best part" or "...a good part "
     
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